Yamadori

Collecting for Bonsai: Dogwood 2016 – Larry’s Place 2

In February, I had the pleasure of scouting trees at my friend Larry’s house. By April the hawthorns were nearly dead Upon further inspection, I found they had a severe infestation of wooly apple aphids, which had destroyed most of their root system. You can see the many galls at the base of this one It’s not wise to remove weak and unhealthy trees, as their survival rate is very low thankfully I had a back-up plan.

On our walk, Larry has spotted a very nice dogwood, one of my favorite trees. With its beautiful bark and spring flowers, I was excited to add one to my collection. Clear the area of debris, then remove the limbs and parts of the trunk you won’t be using, while leaving enough room for potential dieback. Leave any of the fine detail work for later. Next dig a trench around the tree. I give a space of five to six times wider than the base of the tree is in diameter. Don’t hack through the thick roots with the shovel. Leave them for assault fruit Leave them for a saw or pruners. After the first cut, I move outward, and I remove the chunks of earth.

This gap will allow me enough room to cut and pry without disturbing too much of the root ball. I didn’t have any large lateral roots to prune, so I start making undercuts with the shovel. This was a very rare moment when no additional work was needed the entire root ball came right out! Lastly fill in the hole & get your tree home. I start clearing soil away from the base to get an idea of the root system. This dogwood has a cluster of trunks, only one of which i’m going to keep. The visible root structure (or nebari) can affect the direction your tree will be displayed, which also affects which trunk will have the most interest from that point of view take your time with your Take your time with your cuts.

Forcing a cut may cause unwanted damage to other parts of the tree. This trunk was damaged years ago, so I will hollow it out in the future. This last trunk was growing very close to the main one, so I decided to finish off the job with branch cutters. Finally, I whittle down the stubs and make clean cuts. I will smooth the transition more in the future to give character and taper to the tree. A clean cut heals faster than a rough cut. Scrub any moss and debris away with a wire brush. This top section is being removed for scale & taper. A new leader will create the top in the future. Bare rooting is a simple job.

Use a chopstick to clear debris from the roots. This soil is mostly solid clay, which may account for its tight root ball. Trim large roots cleanly with pruners, cutters, or a sharp saw. Smooth any ragged cuts for better healing, and leave as many fine roots as you can. This mica pot has been prepared with wire and screen. Add a fine layer of soil, and arrange the tree. Secure with wires and tighten with pliers. Add coarse well-draining soil, and work in using a chopstick, filling all the crevices. I had one troublesome root that needed to be wired down. Thankfully, mica pots are easily drilled. Finish it all off with the last bit of soil and tamp the sides to settle everything down. The wires underneath the pot can be given a twist to tighten everything securely. Soak your tree thoroughly and let rest in a protected area for a few days. Then, water as needed. The tree only needs to remain damp, not wet.

In four to six weeks, you should see new buds forming. And in two & a half months, you should have good growth like this. If you’ve enjoyed this video, share it with your friends. Like and subscribe, because there’s more to come. Thanks for watching! .

Collecting for Bonsai: Eastern White Pine 2017

We’re going to see a bonsai tree soon! What an adventure, Sorjn! In February, my best friend and I and his son, walked through the neighbor’s field to see if we could find trees to collect for bonsai. We weren’t disappointed. This is a Virginia pine. This is white pine. This is why we dig up trees from a farmer’s field. They just get beat up. Yeah, cool No No. Though there were plenty to look and choose from, only one caught my attention immediately. That is a contender, dude. That is a contender! Look at look at this from this side, man. Wow. That is cool. This is a white pine. That’s quite a white pine though, man. I’ll take that home. I want to mark that one. It’s always good to mark the tree, so you can find them again later.

This also allows you also to bring only the tools you need to do the job. After clearing rocks and debris, I check the roots of the pine. Unlike most of the deciduous trees you’ve seen me dig, pines require many feeder roots in order to survive. If the pine’s tap root goes deep without many surface roots, its chances of survival are very low. Make your first few cuts around the tree. Take your time getting large stones out. This will reduce the risk of injuring yourself or the tree. I periodically wiggle the tree. A strong tap root won’t allow this. If the tree doesn’t budge, leave it in the ground. I’ve checked the roots enough to know that this does not have a large tap root and should come out easily. It’s a windy sunny day, I have a long hike down, and a long drive home. So, I bag up the roots well. Before you leave, make sure you fill the hole back in. It’s just common courtesy. The next step in the process is to clean the roots. This is a field grown pine, which means the soil is poor and full of clay.

A pine that’s growing in a very small crack of rock will have different requirements. Another key difference in collecting pines versus deciduous trees is that pines’ roots should not be washed before they’re put into a bonsai pot. Microorganisms like mycorrhizae are vital for the health and survival of pine trees. You risk washing away these symbiotic components. So, leave the roots dirty. There were a good number of roots for this pine, so, I’ve cut the ones that were aiming downward and cleaned up the cuts from the shovel. I’m using a large plastic tub for this tree. After a few years and the roots have grown, I’ll be able to prune them back for something smaller. The retaining wires holds the tree in place. Just pull and twist Add your coarse soil mix and work into the roots with the chopstick. This soil mixture is 70% inorganic material with 30% pine bark Work the soil in between all the roots and try to fill as many gaps as you can. It can be helpful to start at the base of the tree and work your way outward.

A quick shake can also give a little bit of help. Once the tree has been potted up, soak it in water to ensure that all particles are saturated. Then set it aside out of wind and direct sun for a few weeks. The soil should remain damp but not wet. When the candles extend in springtime, you can begin to fertilize. This white pine has had some incredible growth this spring and summer. But, it’s going to be many years before it will be considered a good bonsai. I think we’re off to a good start. Thanks for watching. .

Honeysuckle Bonsai – Update from 2018

Welcome to Appalachian bonsai. Today’s video is gonna be a pruning of this Amur Honeysuckle. This honeysuckle was collected back in 2017. It was on my friend Lemuel’s property. Now, the thing about the Amur honeysuckle is it is extremely invasive here in the United States. Originally it comes from Asia, but it has made its way over, and I think that it is perfect for collection. If any of you out there have issues with collecting trees from the wild, give invasive species a try. There’s nothing wrong with collecting a tree that’s not supposed to be there in the first place. The footage for this video was captured April 2018, which was a fine time to prune. it’s now January 2019, which is not necessarily a good time to prune, but, January is a great time to edit videos you didn’t have time to edit last year. I hope that clears up any questions you might have had about the seasons.

If you’ll notice with this pruning, I’m taking it down to one or two buds per branch as well as thinning out the branches. These Amur honeysuckles are extremely vigorous. It’s one of the reasons why they’re invasive. Because of that, it can handle this type of pruning. There were many parts on this tree that were already dead, and I knew that going in to collecting it. But now that it’s had a full year of growth I understand where I want to grind, where to carve, and where to make artistic changes to the trunk and the structure of the tree. When using a pruning saw be careful not to force the blade. If you force the blade, your last cut might continue on and cut another section of live tree that you did not want to touch.

When I cut a large piece, like right here, I’ll cut the majority of the way through the trunk and then I will come on the back side and slightly cut it until it just falls off. There are many ways to carve up a tree, but I’m gonna be using a four inch wire wheel. Now, this wire grinder is often used for cleaning metal, but it does a pretty good job of carving up old dead wood, too. What I’m doing here is adding a taper to the trunk. We have a flat top and by cutting out a chunk I can make it look as if the tree is tapering towards that larger left branch. So, breaking it off right there, and I have better taper.

Now to finish it up a little bit more. The beauty of these large tools is you can eat away a lot of material at one time. Just be careful you don’t take away too much or hurt yourself. Now I’m using a Dremel tool with a little burr on it, and this is adding some finer details. You see those holes are actual worm holes. Those are from beetles and other types of insects and I am exploiting them. They are natural, and I want to accentuate them and add these lines that follow the curve of the trunk, follow those bug holes, open up those bug holes, and it just adds so much depth. I think it’s just a really gorgeous feature. I’ll finish it up with a little wire wheel.

This miniature wire wheel just takes off all the little frayed pieces of the wood. Let’s take a look at those roots. This tree is extremely hardy, as I’ve said before. Wow! Look at that! That’s a lot of roots! That’s one year of growth from this particular species. It’s also one of the reasons why I’m able to do a heavy prune on the top and a heavy prune on the bottom and still allow it to survive. Use your chopstick to clear out the old soil. This tree has been without water for a couple of days. With the soil a little bit dry it falls out so much easier. You don’t have a muddy mess. There’s our puppy dog. His name is Rocky. He is a pain. We love him. tease those roots out with your hands, with the chopsticks, or whatever tools that you find easiest for this type of work.

As you work your way underneath the root ball you can find some roots that can be removed. It will allow the tree to sit a little bit lower into the pot. A nice sharp pair of bonsai pruning shears can make really quick work of these wide outer roots Here is another large root that needs to be removed. It has some smaller fine roots that are growing off the sides above my cut. This helps make sure the root stays alive and I can get it into the pot. I know it seems excessive with all the roots I’ve taken off and all the top I’ve taken off, but as I may say again this is a very hardy species. It can handle this type of work.

Okay, so now that I have the roots pruned up, I can put them into a pot. I have my wires and my screens in place, and I’m adding a little bit of pre-made soil. My soil mixture is three parts Turface MVP, which is a type of fire clay, three parts of pine bark, two parts diatomaceous earth, and one part coarse masonry sand. I have them sifted between two and six millimeters. Check the description for those items if you need to look at them again. You’ll notice I’m adding a little bit of plastic tubing to this wire. This is airline hose, which goes with a lot of aquariums. I’m using it to protect those roots so that as it grows it doesn’t form around that wire, which is sometimes known as wire bite. And then you pull and twist. I’m adding soil to the pot one or two scoops at a time. And then I use my chopstick to work that soil in between each of the roots, starting from the trunk and working my way outward.

If you’ve watched any of my previous videos, I’ve mentioned about working the chopstick up and down, wiggling it from side to side, sometimes you can tap the sides of the pot with your fist and that all helps get that soil in between those fine roots. After you’re done working the soil into your pot make sure you water it thoroughly. Protect your tree from strong sunlight and strong winds for the next couple of days until it’s recovered.

Also, be wary of young puppy dogs. I hope you’ve enjoyed this video. Like and Subscribe, because there’s more to come. Thanks for watching! .

Collecting for Bonsai – Roadside Attractions 1

>> Ben: We’ve all done it. We’ve all driven down the side of the road and just said, ‘Hey! That’s a tree I could go for!’ ♫ bluegrass music ♫ The Department of Transportation, whatever state you’re in, generally mows down the edges so you can have a good line of sight. And that can be beneficial to bonsai hunters, because you can find some very interesting things that may or may not be useful. Look at this hornbeam. This is just awesome. This thing is probably about 4″ – 5″ right there. I’ve got this big long branch that’s next to me. I wonder how well it’s rooted in the ground. Yeah, it’s pretty solid. Got all these rocks around here that will make it very difficult to get out. There’s also, right behind it, right there, a Virginia juniper, which also might make this difficult. But, this tree – I might just have to consider what I can do.

Look at this guy. If you can see it. I don’t know. It could make some interesting stuff. Something to keep in mind. It’s loose, which means I can dig it up. The roots, because I’m looking downhill, the roots are probably coming up this way. So, I need to keep that in mind. Which means this thing is going to be slanted out, and be kinda funky. You know, it’s got some large sections to it. You can see there’s a scar right there, and starting to callous over. I may be able to clean that out, or leave that and clean this out. I like working with this material because one It allows me to toy around, experiment a little bit without really worrying of damaging a really nice yamadori. And you never know – you might come up with some really interesting things in the process. You get a lot of funky looks working on the side of the road, but it’ll be worth it. Here’s a needle juniper – common juniper. You can see, it’s got a pretty interesting trunk here.

Hand for reference. This is in a ditch. Alright. Whoa, look at th.. Awww! Fooled! I thought that was a nice live tree. Nope. That one’s toast. As always, be very careful when you’re working on the side of the road. Here, the Department of Transportation has cut away this guy, right here. This is big. The base is probably 9″ in diameter. Look at that beauty. There’s good and bad points about this: One: It’s already been cut; I can clean up some of this. Two: it may or may not pop out. Three: Getting that baddy out of all this rock.

And this stuff is loose It can fall into the road, which is not good. One: for safety reasons Two: For the annoyance of people who are trying to get by. It’s something to think about, though. That’s what I’m talking about. That’s it right there Look at the shape, the curve, the interest And, it’s right in the middle of a rock. It’s really loose. There may be, right here, where this rock is, there may be just a little bit of an indentation that could probably be hidden either by soil, or it could be hidden by rocks and moss or something.

We won’t even know until we dig this up in the spring. But, i’m getting this guy. Look at that. Just curve, curve, curve, curve and it’s got all these beautiful little flutes in there, that I just love. As always, it’s best to get permission from the owner no matter who it is. That includes the Department of Transportation who maintains the roads here.

I have called the Department of Transportation before, and they have given me permission, But, rules change from year to year. There’s always the possibility that what was relevant one year will not be relevant the next. So, I will be calling again this year to check and see what the possibilities are if I can. Generally, for me, it has been 20 feet from the road. It might now be 15 feet which limits what I can and cannot take. It’s always best, because otherwise, you might get arrested. You might get shot at. You might get in a lot of trouble. So, let’s avoid that as bonsai enthusiasts. We want to be respectful of other people’s property, and, that will make things better for everybody. If we have bonsai artists just going in collecting whatever they can find off the side of the road without asking permission it puts a bad name on everybody. Let’s avoid that at all costs. ♫ bluegrass music ♫ .

How To Create A Bonsai Tree – The Transformation

The first thing to do is to study the tree and take your time. Really look at the structure. This way of thinking will greatly increase the potential and the results of this future bonsai tree. Remove excess soil so you can see where the root surface is ending and the main trunk is beginning. Now it’s time to remove all dead branches and foliage so we can open up the structure even more. Next step will be to select branches.

And you should always go for the branches that are strong vigorous and growing from the best position and at the best angle. Remove the weak and juvenile foliage. Work your way from the bottom to the top. Now it’s time to wire the tree. And we do this because we want a tree that we can shape. Wire the main trunk first. Not too hard and not too loose. When you are applying the wire, use it as a lever. Apply pressure and tension with one hand holding the wire in place while coiling around the main trunk with the other hand. Use one piece of wire for two branches or more if possible.

That gives you stability and anchoring. And it also saves you a lot of wire. Styling and shaping your tree is one of the last parts in the whole design process. This gives us the satisfaction of having the tree exactly as we would imagine. Something that is hard to achieve but can be done with experience and practice So, while bending a bonsai branch it’s important to know that you need to keep pressure and hold tension with your thumbs on the wire and not the branch itself. Because then it might break.

As you can see.. this tree has a lot of feeder roots to work with when Spring comes around the corner. But until then I’m going to let it have it’s Winter’s sleep. This is Johan, and you have been watching “Bonsai Talk.” .

How To Grow Bonsai Trees From Seed – Subtitles Available

Hello, my name is Vinny and today’s story is about how this tiny seed changed into a bonsai tree in just 2 years. this tree is known as white lead tree in English and in India it is called as Su-babul in Hindi. it is an extremely fast growing tree and in many countries it is banned because it is considered as a weed. this tree was born in the pot, in pure garden soil and has survived the peak of my ignorance because I got started in bonsai at that time, around 2 years back. so let me show you some close-ups first and then I’ll tell you more about this this tree was almost 8 feet tall when i first cut it off, so it was chopped off at this height and now the wound has kind of healed nicely I have never wired this tree. I have always pruned it and kept it short and instead of wiring, what I have done actually is preferring to keep these branches downward facing, using twine and this twine has hooks like this, so these metal hooks, they pull the branch down and are inserted or pushed into one of the side holes.

So depending on how much tension I want, I can keep varying the position of the holes. so I kind of like it, the way it has come out now. of course, I will need to do some wiring also but for the time being the main branches are all held down in position with this. i somehow … personally, i don’t like wiring much. I have seen what good it can do but I have a slight aversion to it and besides, good quality wire, Aluminium wire is expensive. so there is a shortage of wire in my collection. so wherever I can get away with this kind of technique I do that but where wire is absolutely essential I do get into that. so this is mainly clip & grow technique and in one of the videos I saw Nigel Saunder’s of the Bonsai Zone explained that most of the amateur people what they’re doing is clip and clip. they are not allowing the plant to grow.

so this was a mistake which I was doing and I then corrected myself. so I clip and let it grow, then again clip, again let it grow because having read the styling techniques I was saying okay this branch is wrong or there are two at the same point and I would immediately go and prune it. so, as a result what happens is the plant is never allowed to grow, it’s always fighting this pruning disease. you have got to let the plant grow wild then clip, again let it grow wild then clip again. so that’s how it’s supposed to go. i was very naive. in part 2 of this video I’ll be covering the following things – .