Gardening (Interest)

Bonsai Repotting – Bonsai Trees for Beginners Series #04

Hello my name is Mark D’Cruz of Ma-Ke Bonsai and with me is Jonny Gires. Today we’re going to demonstrate how to repot a bonsai (Ligistrum sinense) We have chosen a Turquoise blue pot to replace the last pot. I’m going to talk a bit about the tools we are going to use. To start off with we have a spatula to help firm down the bonsai soil we then have a jin plier and wire cutter the wire cutter is to help with remove wires that bind the tree into the pot and to replace it with new wire ties finally tie the bonsai into the pot… the sickle is very important tool because more often than not you have to the bonsai out of the pot then we have two little brushes or rather three little brushes that help us with the tidiness and cleanliness of the pot. the the plastic brushes used to clean the bark, the metal brush is use to clean the pot the coco brush is used to tidy up the surface of the pot once we have repotting it and here we have two set of scissors to help us with cutting the roots We have a root cutter this one to cut the finer roots they are very, very sharp and very strong umm..

Here we have a root cutter to cut off heavier roots within the bonsai and one of the most important tools as far as we are concerned is… what we call a bidder, its just a piece of metal some thing like a metal chopstick the chopstick that helps us with the clearing the top of the root surface the pot has a curved surface surface so it the site has got in between the the soil has got under the lip of the pot so we cannot just pull it out off the pot so we are going to going to do is cut off the bonsai from the pot this requires a bit of strenght and we are using a sickle to help us with the cutting of the soil if the root-ball is not coming out use a chop stick to help prise it out you can see the roots are massed up and it definitely needs to be repotted. as you can see there’s a substantial amount of roots, some we have already removed from the root-ball but we still have a bit more to remove cut away the roots that were removed by the sickle so first of all Johnny is going to start by clearing of the soil Johnny is going to clean the moss that is on the bark the soft nylon brush ensures the bark is not damaged but it removes all the moss that may have collected Johnny is going to remove half to 1 cm of soils from the bottom so any excessively long root are removed and cut away so we have a clean root ball at the bottom Next thing Johnny is going to do is cut out the excess root ball to fit the new pot Use the dibber to mark all round the root-ball, making sure it is centered in the pot and make sure the bonsai is centered in the pot and now its fits absolutely comfortably in the pot with enough room to accommodate the new soil For the repotting we use a special bonsai mix which in this case is a mixture of Akadama and Pumice the grain size is between 3mm and 6mm and as you can see it is a very granular mixture Place a thin layer of mix at the bottom of the pot place the bonsai on it and jiggle around till you get it in the centre of the pot the trunk has to be absolutely vertical in all directions vertical from the front and vertical from the side fill more soil in to the pot and use a rubber mallet to settle the soil into the pot this is a rubber mallet that has been softened by boiling in water we need to ensure that the tree is firmly in the pot we test by moving the trunk, if the pot and trunk move together we know the tree is firmly in the pot.

the next step is to use the spatula to firm the soil in moving all around the the pot The final step is to bind the tree into the pot with the wire is bound from one end to the other end and tightened with the jin pliers twisting it clockwise while binding the wires ensure that that they are not tied in the middle of the pot but on the far extremes of the pot as we we’ve done these two, you then cut of any excess what making sure that there is not much of a tail left Johnny then water the pot by giving it a dunking in a tub of water pot rim stays just above the surface of the water and the water rises into the pot from below and you should soon see it at the top of the pot lift the pot up and let excess water drain out Last step in in repotting is to cover the surface with with a thin layer of dried sphagnum moss the sphagnum moss protects surface root of the bonsai by not letting the pot do it too fast the last bit to do, is to ensure that the pot is cleaned up and polished Here we have Camellia Oil and an emery rubber that helps with cleaning up and finishing off the pot and that’s how we Repot A Bonsai Tree

Indoor Bonsai – Bonsai Trees for Beginners – Indoor Bonsai Care मार्क बोन्साई 03

 My name is Mark D’Cruz of Ma-Ke Bonsai and I’m going to talk to you about indoor bonsai care. There are effectively, over time we kind of learned that there’s nine different conditions that need to be met. First of all, light. Light is crucial to bonsais and often, without light, bonsais will perish. They will die slowly but they will die. Growing it on a window like this, a nice big bay window, ideally, it should be a south facing window, but if you don’t have one, then any facing window is good. For some species you may need to add extra light in which case you use a light like this. This particular light uses a white light of 64,000 Kelvin which is ideal for growing bonsai. The next thing that you need to consider is of course water. Plants, like outdoor plants, need to be watered regularly when they are dry to the touch. Water them like you would do to outdoor plants. Ideally I would dunk them. Give them a dunking in a basin or a bucket. That helps to make sure that all the bowls are full.

Another important factor to consider in growing trees indoors is heat. Now in a modern home like ours in the UK, that’s not really much of a problem because central heating takes care of heating in winter time. The only consideration is just to make sure that you do not place your bonsai directly over the heat source like, for example, a radiator or something like that, in which case, the dry heat from the radiator is going to kill the bonsai.

Bonsais need to be cooler in the night than during the day but not too cold. Many times bonsais will get too cold in the night so you need to monitor the temperature. Above 6 degrees is tolerable. Below 6 degrees gets difficult for the bonsai in the night. Plants need humidity. If you have a dry room which rooms get very dry with the central heating, the plants will suffer quite considerably.

So that’s why we have humidity trays under each of the bonsais. That provides a little microclimate for the tree so that it manages to deal with the humidity. Bonsais need to have air circulating around them. So if you put a bonsai in a place where there is no air circulation, eventually what happens is that fungus and other pests settle on it and it gets damaged, and it will die because of over fungus on the tree. Feeding and fertilizing. Use a balanced fertilizer 4/4/4 strength of 6/6/6. If you’re using a liquid fertilizer, feed every two weeks. If you’re using a pellet-type fertiliser, feed every two months or when the pellets disappear. Just like outdoor trees, indoor trees will suffer from from pests and disease. You need to keep a lookout for them. Indoor trees, because there’s a lack of circulation can suffer from pests quite often.

Scale is quite a problem indoors as is aphids and spider mites. Bonsai pots and trees need to be kept clean. You need to regularly clean them out, brush them out so that if there’s any dead matter in the trees, remove any dead wood is removed, any dead leaves are removed so that circulation is always encouraged by cleaning up the thing. Keep the top of the pot clean because then no bugs and no pests will settle in the dead matter that’s on top of the soil. And finally, dormancy. All trees need dormancy. They need to rest. Another thing to remember is that if you are growing, like I am here on the window sill, in the winter time, do not close the curtains over the plants. The warm air from the room will not come onto the plants and then the tree will just suffer from the cold air that comes in from the outside, and the coolness that comes out.

And that’s how you look after indoor bonsais. .

How to make bonsai tree Fuji Cherry or Prunus incisa Kojo-no-mai Bonsai Trees From Nursery Stock

 Hello folks welcome to Ma-Ke Bonsai. This is Mark D’Cruz. Today, I have Adriana with me and we’re going to pot this Fuji Cherry which make beautiful bonsais. This particular picture is of a tree at Kew and you can see it has this beautiful weeping habit which we will try and replicate over the next few years of training. Adriana got this for 8 pounds from the garden centre. She’s going to take it out of the pot and work on the nebari.

You start working on the nebari from the top and move down. Move away soil with a chopstick and then gently cut away the roots that have been exposed. Brush the trunk and the nebari to remove any soil and moss that may have collected on the trunk. The trunk is the oldest part of the tree and by exposing it properly, you will show off the age of the bonsai as you are creating it. She’s working on removing some of the bigger roots at the moment. Tapering the root ball so that it has a slope to the centre of the tree. Adriana carefully measures the depth of the pot and the width of the pot to ensure that she has the root ball to the right size. She would mark out the areas that she needs to cut away although keeping in mind that there is one centimetre space between the root ball and the pot surface.

She uses little tags to mark where she’s going to cut to. Because this is a peat based potting mix from the garden centre, it’s actually quite easily done. But with normal bonsai soils, it’s a little bit more tedious but nevertheless, the same instructions have to be followed. What about that Mark? Is that too high? I would go down one centimetre, one and a half centimetre because you’ve got to put soil in it. And then that height is more or less what you want it to be. I’m going to open it a bit more here, as it grows.

That pot is absolutely perfect for it. Adriana adds a thin layer of soil at the base of the pot and then makes a little mound in the centre. She places the root ball in it, jiggles it and fills it up with soil. And then ties the tie wires that we’ve had in the pot. She first hand ties it and cuts away the excess and then ties it with the jin plier to make sure that there is no slack in the tree. However, this is a relatively tall tree in the pot and it will need additional support while the roots extend into the new soil after which it will be fine. Towards the end of the video, you will see how we provide the additional support. Adriana is using the jin pliers now to tighten the wire and remove any slack between the soil and the wire.

Adriana is topping up the surface with some fresh soil. The soil will provide a new area for fresh roots at the top to grow. After a quick dunking, she is adding a thin layer of sphagnum moss onto the soil. The sphagnum moss helps with retaining moisture in the pot and also ensures that the topsoil doesn’t run away when you water it. After the sphagnum moss has been done, she will add green moss onto it at a later stage. She now flattens it down with a spatula to have a nice even gradient from the top of the pot to the top of the nebari, the rim of the pot. And it takes a little bit of doing but the end result is And it takes a little bit of doing but the end result is a very clean, freshly, nicely done pot.

And that’s what we’re looking for. She’s now tying the additional guide wires to ensure that the bonsai is held firmly in the pot so that there is no chance of even the slightest bit of movement once it has settled into it. Adriana is using jute twine to provide the additional support for the tree and this stage is quite essential. Makes the tree much stronger. If you do not add these guide wires on a tall tree like this, the tree tends to move with the breeze and the watering and its recovery can take much longer. But there we are. Here is the end result of the day’s work. It’s a nice-looking tree and it will develop into a weeping style as we go along. The top branches will be curved down and wired down or weighted down depending on which approach Adriana takes. Thank you for watching. We hope you liked the video. If you did, give us a thumbs up, otherwise there’s the other thumbs. But either way, do subscribe and we hope to see you again soon. Thank you for watching.

This is Mark D’Cruz signing out. .

How to make bonsai tree Fuji Cherry or Prunus incisa Kojo-no-mai Bonsai Trees From Nursery Stock

 Hello folks welcome to Ma-Ke Bonsai. This is Mark D’Cruz. Today, I have Adriana with me and we’re going to pot this Fuji Cherry which make beautiful bonsais. This particular picture is of a tree at Kew and you can see it has this beautiful weeping habit which we will try and replicate over the next few years of training. Adriana got this for 8 pounds from the garden centre. She’s going to take it out of the pot and work on the nebari. You start working on the nebari from the top and move down. Move away soil with a chopstick and then gently cut away the roots that have been exposed. Brush the trunk and the nebari to remove any soil and moss that may have collected on the trunk. The trunk is the oldest part of the tree and by exposing it properly, you will show off the age of the bonsai as you are creating it.

She’s working on removing some of the bigger roots at the moment. Tapering the root ball so that it has a slope to the centre of the tree. Adriana carefully measures the depth of the pot and the width of the pot to ensure that she has the root ball to the right size. She would mark out the areas that she needs to cut away although keeping in mind that there is one centimetre space between the root ball and the pot surface. She uses little tags to mark where she’s going to cut to.

Because this is a peat based potting mix from the garden centre, it’s actually quite easily done. But with normal bonsai soils, it’s a little bit more tedious but nevertheless, the same instructions have to be followed. What about that Mark? Is that too high? I would go down one centimetre, one and a half centimetre because you’ve got to put soil in it. And then that height is more or less what you want it to be. I’m going to open it a bit more here, as it grows. That pot is absolutely perfect for it. Adriana adds a thin layer of soil at the base of the pot and then makes a little mound in the centre. She places the root ball in it, jiggles it and fills it up with soil. And then ties the tie wires that we’ve had in the pot. She first hand ties it and cuts away the excess and then ties it with the jin plier to make sure that there is no slack in the tree.

However, this is a relatively tall tree in the pot and it will need additional support while the roots extend into the new soil after which it will be fine. Towards the end of the video, you will see how we provide the additional support. Adriana is using the jin pliers now to tighten the wire and remove any slack between the soil and the wire. Adriana is topping up the surface with some fresh soil. The soil will provide a new area for fresh roots at the top to grow. After a quick dunking, she is adding a thin layer of sphagnum moss onto the soil. The sphagnum moss helps with retaining moisture in the pot and also ensures that the topsoil doesn’t run away when you water it. After the sphagnum moss has been done, she will add green moss onto it at a later stage.

She now flattens it down with a spatula to have a nice even gradient from the top of the pot to the top of the nebari, the rim of the pot. And it takes a little bit of doing but the end result is And it takes a little bit of doing but the end result is a very clean, freshly, nicely done pot.

And that’s what we’re looking for. She’s now tying the additional guide wires to ensure that the bonsai is held firmly in the pot so that there is no chance of even the slightest bit of movement once it has settled into it. Adriana is using jute twine to provide the additional support for the tree and this stage is quite essential. Makes the tree much stronger. If you do not add these guide wires on a tall tree like this, the tree tends to move with the breeze and the watering and its recovery can take much longer. But there we are. Here is the end result of the day’s work. It’s a nice-looking tree and it will develop into a weeping style as we go along.

The top branches will be curved down and wired down or weighted down depending on which approach Adriana takes. Thank you for watching. We hope you liked the video. If you did, give us a thumbs up, otherwise there’s the other thumbs. But either way, do subscribe and we hope to see you again soon. Thank you for watching. This is Mark D’Cruz signing out. .

How to make bonsai Olive or European Olive Bonsai Tree with Ginta bonsai trees #95

Quite good. Yeah, and near the leaves, underneath the branches. Ok. So if there’s a branch, obviously the leaves need to come out. It’s not a stem, it’s a branch. So the stems have leaves and the branches don’t. Branches have other branches on them, no stems. I think they’re too many as well. Shall we take off this one? Actually there are already too many which means something has to go. I think that one has to go, this one. Right, first let’s remove the leaf so we can see the tree, as there’s too many leaves around. So now we can see some branches emerging. I think this one has to go. No, because that is coming out outwards nicely, can you see? So that forms a nice, this guy, first of all is too ugly. Why is too ugly? Because it is straight absolutely, there is no ramification in it.

The little ones are always what we want because bonsai is all about small branches so we try and keep them. There are three coming out of here so… So take the biggest one out and leave the two smaller ones. How is it looking? It’s looking good. Ok, empty out your tray now. .

How to make bonsai tree Fuji Cherry or Prunus incisa Kojo-no-mai Bonsai Trees From Nursery Stock

 Hello folks welcome to Ma-Ke Bonsai. This is Mark D’Cruz. Today, I have Adriana with me and we’re going to pot this Fuji Cherry which make beautiful bonsais. This particular picture is of a tree at Kew and you can see it has this beautiful weeping habit which we will try and replicate over the next few years of training. Adriana got this for 8 pounds from the garden centre. She’s going to take it out of the pot and work on the nebari. You start working on the nebari from the top and move down. Move away soil with a chopstick and then gently cut away the roots that have been exposed. Brush the trunk and the nebari to remove any soil and moss that may have collected on the trunk. The trunk is the oldest part of the tree and by exposing it properly, you will show off the age of the bonsai as you are creating it.

She’s working on removing some of the bigger roots at the moment. Tapering the root ball so that it has a slope to the centre of the tree. Adriana carefully measures the depth of the pot and the width of the pot to ensure that she has the root ball to the right size. She would mark out the areas that she needs to cut away although keeping in mind that there is one centimetre space between the root ball and the pot surface. She uses little tags to mark where she’s going to cut to. Because this is a peat based potting mix from the garden centre, it’s actually quite easily done. But with normal bonsai soils, it’s a little bit more tedious but nevertheless, the same instructions have to be followed.

What about that Mark? Is that too high? I would go down one centimetre, one and a half centimetre because you’ve got to put soil in it. And then that height is more or less what you want it to be. I’m going to open it a bit more here, as it grows. That pot is absolutely perfect for it. Adriana adds a thin layer of soil at the base of the pot and then makes a little mound in the centre. She places the root ball in it, jiggles it and fills it up with soil. And then ties the tie wires that we’ve had in the pot. She first hand ties it and cuts away the excess and then ties it with the jin plier to make sure that there is no slack in the tree.

However, this is a relatively tall tree in the pot and it will need additional support while the roots extend into the new soil after which it will be fine. Towards the end of the video, you will see how we provide the additional support. Adriana is using the jin pliers now to tighten the wire and remove any slack between the soil and the wire. Adriana is topping up the surface with some fresh soil.

The soil will provide a new area for fresh roots at the top to grow. After a quick dunking, she is adding a thin layer of sphagnum moss onto the soil. The sphagnum moss helps with retaining moisture in the pot and also ensures that the topsoil doesn’t run away when you water it. After the sphagnum moss has been done, she will add green moss onto it at a later stage.

She now flattens it down with a spatula to have a nice even gradient from the top of the pot to the top of the nebari, the rim of the pot. And it takes a little bit of doing but the end result is And it takes a little bit of doing but the end result is a very clean, freshly, nicely done pot. And that’s what we’re looking for. She’s now tying the additional guide wires to ensure that the bonsai is held firmly in the pot so that there is no chance of even the slightest bit of movement once it has settled into it. Adriana is using jute twine to provide the additional support for the tree and this stage is quite essential. Makes the tree much stronger. If you do not add these guide wires on a tall tree like this, the tree tends to move with the breeze and the watering and its recovery can take much longer. But there we are. Here is the end result of the day’s work. It’s a nice-looking tree and it will develop into a weeping style as we go along.

The top branches will be curved down and wired down or weighted down depending on which approach Adriana takes. Thank you for watching. We hope you liked the video. If you did, give us a thumbs up, otherwise there’s the other thumbs. But either way, do subscribe and we hope to see you again soon. Thank you for watching. This is Mark D’Cruz signing out. .

How to make bonsai tree Fuji Cherry or Prunus incisa Kojo-no-mai Bonsai Trees From Nursery Stock

 Hello folks welcome to Ma-Ke Bonsai. This is Mark D’Cruz. Today, I have Adriana with me and we’re going to pot this Fuji Cherry which make beautiful bonsais. This particular picture is of a tree at Kew and you can see it has this beautiful weeping habit which we will try and replicate over the next few years of training. Adriana got this for 8 pounds from the garden centre. She’s going to take it out of the pot and work on the nebari. You start working on the nebari from the top and move down. Move away soil with a chopstick and then gently cut away the roots that have been exposed.

Brush the trunk and the nebari to remove any soil and moss that may have collected on the trunk. The trunk is the oldest part of the tree and by exposing it properly, you will show off the age of the bonsai as you are creating it. She’s working on removing some of the bigger roots at the moment. Tapering the root ball so that it has a slope to the centre of the tree. Adriana carefully measures the depth of the pot and the width of the pot to ensure that she has the root ball to the right size. She would mark out the areas that she needs to cut away although keeping in mind that there is one centimetre space between the root ball and the pot surface. She uses little tags to mark where she’s going to cut to. Because this is a peat based potting mix from the garden centre, it’s actually quite easily done. But with normal bonsai soils, it’s a little bit more tedious but nevertheless, the same instructions have to be followed. What about that Mark? Is that too high? I would go down one centimetre, one and a half centimetre because you’ve got to put soil in it.

And then that height is more or less what you want it to be. I’m going to open it a bit more here, as it grows. That pot is absolutely perfect for it. Adriana adds a thin layer of soil at the base of the pot and then makes a little mound in the centre. She places the root ball in it, jiggles it and fills it up with soil. And then ties the tie wires that we’ve had in the pot. She first hand ties it and cuts away the excess and then ties it with the jin plier to make sure that there is no slack in the tree.

However, this is a relatively tall tree in the pot and it will need additional support while the roots extend into the new soil after which it will be fine. Towards the end of the video, you will see how we provide the additional support. Adriana is using the jin pliers now to tighten the wire and remove any slack between the soil and the wire. Adriana is topping up the surface with some fresh soil. The soil will provide a new area for fresh roots at the top to grow. After a quick dunking, she is adding a thin layer of sphagnum moss onto the soil.

The sphagnum moss helps with retaining moisture in the pot and also ensures that the topsoil doesn’t run away when you water it. After the sphagnum moss has been done, she will add green moss onto it at a later stage. She now flattens it down with a spatula to have a nice even gradient from the top of the pot to the top of the nebari, the rim of the pot. And it takes a little bit of doing but the end result is And it takes a little bit of doing but the end result is a very clean, freshly, nicely done pot. And that’s what we’re looking for. She’s now tying the additional guide wires to ensure that the bonsai is held firmly in the pot so that there is no chance of even the slightest bit of movement once it has settled into it.

Adriana is using jute twine to provide the additional support for the tree and this stage is quite essential. Makes the tree much stronger. If you do not add these guide wires on a tall tree like this, the tree tends to move with the breeze and the watering and its recovery can take much longer. But there we are. Here is the end result of the day’s work.

It’s a nice-looking tree and it will develop into a weeping style as we go along. The top branches will be curved down and wired down or weighted down depending on which approach Adriana takes. Thank you for watching. We hope you liked the video. If you did, give us a thumbs up, otherwise there’s the other thumbs. But either way, do subscribe and we hope to see you again soon. Thank you for watching. This is Mark D’Cruz signing out. .

01) How to Care for Chinese Elm Bonsai – Bonsai Trees for Beginners Series मार्क बोन्साई

My name is Mark D’Cruz of Ma-Ke Bonsai and I’m going to talk to you about Chinese elms and their care. Chinese elms are by far the largest number of bonsai sold in the UK, in Europe and most probably in the world. You can identify Chinese Elms by their small leaves. Their leaves are about two to six centimeters long. They are serrated, they have teeth marks all around the edges, and all the bonsai, the branching can be very very fine, which is what mature Chinese Elms look like and it’s excellent quality. Chinese Elms come in many different sizes from small 15 centimetre ones to medium size, 45 centimetres, to the larger ones which are about two feet tall. You place a Chinese Elm, if it’s going indoors, by a window sill when it needs a lot of light and it can take variations in temperature quite well. If it is grown outdoors, the Chinese Elm is very versatile.

It can be grown from semi shade to full sunny position, and when it’s grown indoors, the watering is minimal but the plant has always to be kept damp but not allowed to dry out and at the same time, not allowed to be waterlogged. If it is outdoors, the watering is a little bit more versatile but again, it doesn’t like being dried out totally or being constantly wet. If it dries out, the tree can very easily shed all its leaves, although it’s a forgiving tree and it will bounce back quite regularly.

Having over watered a Chinese Elm can be quite problematic because it will die slowly and it takes about six months to die and you don’t even know that you’re killing the tree because of over watering. Chinese Elms need to be groomed regularly and you prune it when the leaves have grown to about six or seven leaves long and you cut it back to just leaving two leaf nodes. You feed it every two to, every 15 days, every two weeks, If you’re using a liquid fertiliser If you’re using a solid fertiliser, or a pellet based fertiliser, you’d feed it every two months.

When you repot a Chinese Elm, you use a well draining soil. At Market Bonsai, we tend to use Akadama and Pumice and we use it in the ratio of 2:1. Two parts of Akadama and one part of Pumice Chinese Elms propagate very easily. You can propagate them from cuttings They have a very high success rate of propagating. And that’s how you care for Chinese Elms. .

How to make Bonsai tree for Beginners from Garden Center Plants

Making trees or growing your own trees is a very satisfying way of making your collection larger in bonsais. You can grow them from seed, you can even collect them from the wild, you can get them from friends or you can buy a ready-made bonsai. But I think one of the more, or the less talked about areas is to make a bonsai from nursery stock, normal garden centre stock. Selecting trees in the nursery. Well, you start off with some idea of what you want whether you want deciduous or whether you’re after some evergreen trees. But having decided, you go to the relevant sections and try and look for trees that have interest in the trunk or in the foliage or the shape of the tree itself is attractive. Once you’ve identified the tree, then the next step is to try and work with it. So the first thing to do is to take the tree out of the pot. You generally have to thump it out with a mallet or with a wooden block. Hit the sides of the pot and it may just dislodge Once that’s done, use a turntable and then work with a metal chopstick or wooden chopstick to start clearing away soil from the top of the tree to see what kind of nebari you have.

You can work down towards where the nebari is exposed. Once you’ve found the nebari, you look for the front of the tree and the front usually shows off the best movement in the tree. That should give you an idea as to which way the tree is leaning or which way the tree has a lot of character. You then start looking for the structure within the tree so you clear away excess foliage, you clear away excess branches, and when you’ve done that, then you can try and style it by wiring it or shortening some of the branches. The next step after a little while is to choose a suitable pot and then match the pot with the tree.

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18) Flowering Crab Apple Bonsai Tree Specimen from Field Grown Bonsai Stock

 Hello bonsai enthusiasts. In this video, we’re going to repot a Crab Apple. This particular one is about 21 years old. It’s been field grown for 18 years and has been in this black pot for about three years. It’s now pot bound and it’s time to repot into a bonsai pot. It’s got a lot of features and it’s nicely branched out and it would make a lovely bonsai. We start off, I guess, by knocking the pot off. Generally, you thump the side of the pot and then thump the top of the pot off to help dislodge it from the root ball. Use a stainless steel dibber or even a wooden dibber to help remove soil from the top of the surface. Use a sharp root shear and root cutters to help you with removing the finer roots and the larger roots.

Shape the root ball so that it tapers gently towards the soil. Remove any large, ugly roots and work your way, all the way to the bottom of the pot, working gently and slowly. While using the chopstick, try not to use it vertically, but use it horizontally so that you’re not digging into the root ball. Rather, moving bit by bit away. You may have to use a chisel and mallet to try and remove some of the larger roots or help shape the nebari properly. I’m using a half an inch gorge in this particular, half an inch gorge chisel in this particular section. It’s very effective at tapering nebaris. You then work your way all around the root ball cutting off any large roots as you work around. Make sure that the root ball doesn’t disintegrate. Keep it firm and solid all the time and this is quite a nicely shaped nebari. It’s nicely tapered and remove down to the bottom of the root ball. We’re now ready to pot on. This pot has been nicely meshed out and wires have been installed in the pot.

That will help us bind the tree into the pot. This is a Japanese blue pot, oval shaped to help accentuate the feminineness of the Crab Apple. It’s a pot bellied shape so it adds value to the overall aesthetic of the tree. I’m using a mixture of Akadama and pumice in the soil that I’m using for the tree. It’s granular, 3 – 6 mm. You make a little mound in the centre of the pot and then use the, place it so that it fits in the centre of the pot, both along the length and the breadth of the pot, and the nebari should be just slightly above the pot surface. Fill up the pot with soil and then use a mallet so that the soil falls properly into the pot and all the empty spaces are filled out, Top up wherever necessary and gradually process it. The tree is now ready, it’s quite an attractive bonsai. I hope you enjoyed the show. .