flowering bonsai

How to make bonsai tree Fuji Cherry or Prunus incisa Kojo-no-mai Bonsai Trees From Nursery Stock

 Hello folks welcome to Ma-Ke Bonsai. This is Mark D’Cruz. Today, I have Adriana with me and we’re going to pot this Fuji Cherry which make beautiful bonsais. This particular picture is of a tree at Kew and you can see it has this beautiful weeping habit which we will try and replicate over the next few years of training. Adriana got this for 8 pounds from the garden centre. She’s going to take it out of the pot and work on the nebari.

You start working on the nebari from the top and move down. Move away soil with a chopstick and then gently cut away the roots that have been exposed. Brush the trunk and the nebari to remove any soil and moss that may have collected on the trunk. The trunk is the oldest part of the tree and by exposing it properly, you will show off the age of the bonsai as you are creating it. She’s working on removing some of the bigger roots at the moment. Tapering the root ball so that it has a slope to the centre of the tree. Adriana carefully measures the depth of the pot and the width of the pot to ensure that she has the root ball to the right size. She would mark out the areas that she needs to cut away although keeping in mind that there is one centimetre space between the root ball and the pot surface.

She uses little tags to mark where she’s going to cut to. Because this is a peat based potting mix from the garden centre, it’s actually quite easily done. But with normal bonsai soils, it’s a little bit more tedious but nevertheless, the same instructions have to be followed. What about that Mark? Is that too high? I would go down one centimetre, one and a half centimetre because you’ve got to put soil in it. And then that height is more or less what you want it to be. I’m going to open it a bit more here, as it grows.

That pot is absolutely perfect for it. Adriana adds a thin layer of soil at the base of the pot and then makes a little mound in the centre. She places the root ball in it, jiggles it and fills it up with soil. And then ties the tie wires that we’ve had in the pot. She first hand ties it and cuts away the excess and then ties it with the jin plier to make sure that there is no slack in the tree. However, this is a relatively tall tree in the pot and it will need additional support while the roots extend into the new soil after which it will be fine. Towards the end of the video, you will see how we provide the additional support. Adriana is using the jin pliers now to tighten the wire and remove any slack between the soil and the wire.

Adriana is topping up the surface with some fresh soil. The soil will provide a new area for fresh roots at the top to grow. After a quick dunking, she is adding a thin layer of sphagnum moss onto the soil. The sphagnum moss helps with retaining moisture in the pot and also ensures that the topsoil doesn’t run away when you water it. After the sphagnum moss has been done, she will add green moss onto it at a later stage. She now flattens it down with a spatula to have a nice even gradient from the top of the pot to the top of the nebari, the rim of the pot. And it takes a little bit of doing but the end result is And it takes a little bit of doing but the end result is a very clean, freshly, nicely done pot.

And that’s what we’re looking for. She’s now tying the additional guide wires to ensure that the bonsai is held firmly in the pot so that there is no chance of even the slightest bit of movement once it has settled into it. Adriana is using jute twine to provide the additional support for the tree and this stage is quite essential. Makes the tree much stronger. If you do not add these guide wires on a tall tree like this, the tree tends to move with the breeze and the watering and its recovery can take much longer. But there we are. Here is the end result of the day’s work. It’s a nice-looking tree and it will develop into a weeping style as we go along. The top branches will be curved down and wired down or weighted down depending on which approach Adriana takes. Thank you for watching. We hope you liked the video. If you did, give us a thumbs up, otherwise there’s the other thumbs. But either way, do subscribe and we hope to see you again soon. Thank you for watching.

This is Mark D’Cruz signing out. .

How to make bonsai tree Fuji Cherry or Prunus incisa Kojo-no-mai Bonsai Trees From Nursery Stock

 Hello folks welcome to Ma-Ke Bonsai. This is Mark D’Cruz. Today, I have Adriana with me and we’re going to pot this Fuji Cherry which make beautiful bonsais. This particular picture is of a tree at Kew and you can see it has this beautiful weeping habit which we will try and replicate over the next few years of training. Adriana got this for 8 pounds from the garden centre. She’s going to take it out of the pot and work on the nebari. You start working on the nebari from the top and move down. Move away soil with a chopstick and then gently cut away the roots that have been exposed. Brush the trunk and the nebari to remove any soil and moss that may have collected on the trunk. The trunk is the oldest part of the tree and by exposing it properly, you will show off the age of the bonsai as you are creating it.

She’s working on removing some of the bigger roots at the moment. Tapering the root ball so that it has a slope to the centre of the tree. Adriana carefully measures the depth of the pot and the width of the pot to ensure that she has the root ball to the right size. She would mark out the areas that she needs to cut away although keeping in mind that there is one centimetre space between the root ball and the pot surface. She uses little tags to mark where she’s going to cut to.

Because this is a peat based potting mix from the garden centre, it’s actually quite easily done. But with normal bonsai soils, it’s a little bit more tedious but nevertheless, the same instructions have to be followed. What about that Mark? Is that too high? I would go down one centimetre, one and a half centimetre because you’ve got to put soil in it. And then that height is more or less what you want it to be. I’m going to open it a bit more here, as it grows. That pot is absolutely perfect for it. Adriana adds a thin layer of soil at the base of the pot and then makes a little mound in the centre. She places the root ball in it, jiggles it and fills it up with soil. And then ties the tie wires that we’ve had in the pot. She first hand ties it and cuts away the excess and then ties it with the jin plier to make sure that there is no slack in the tree.

However, this is a relatively tall tree in the pot and it will need additional support while the roots extend into the new soil after which it will be fine. Towards the end of the video, you will see how we provide the additional support. Adriana is using the jin pliers now to tighten the wire and remove any slack between the soil and the wire. Adriana is topping up the surface with some fresh soil. The soil will provide a new area for fresh roots at the top to grow. After a quick dunking, she is adding a thin layer of sphagnum moss onto the soil. The sphagnum moss helps with retaining moisture in the pot and also ensures that the topsoil doesn’t run away when you water it. After the sphagnum moss has been done, she will add green moss onto it at a later stage.

She now flattens it down with a spatula to have a nice even gradient from the top of the pot to the top of the nebari, the rim of the pot. And it takes a little bit of doing but the end result is And it takes a little bit of doing but the end result is a very clean, freshly, nicely done pot.

And that’s what we’re looking for. She’s now tying the additional guide wires to ensure that the bonsai is held firmly in the pot so that there is no chance of even the slightest bit of movement once it has settled into it. Adriana is using jute twine to provide the additional support for the tree and this stage is quite essential. Makes the tree much stronger. If you do not add these guide wires on a tall tree like this, the tree tends to move with the breeze and the watering and its recovery can take much longer. But there we are. Here is the end result of the day’s work. It’s a nice-looking tree and it will develop into a weeping style as we go along.

The top branches will be curved down and wired down or weighted down depending on which approach Adriana takes. Thank you for watching. We hope you liked the video. If you did, give us a thumbs up, otherwise there’s the other thumbs. But either way, do subscribe and we hope to see you again soon. Thank you for watching. This is Mark D’Cruz signing out. .

How to make bonsai tree Fuji Cherry or Prunus incisa Kojo-no-mai Bonsai Trees From Nursery Stock

 Hello folks welcome to Ma-Ke Bonsai. This is Mark D’Cruz. Today, I have Adriana with me and we’re going to pot this Fuji Cherry which make beautiful bonsais. This particular picture is of a tree at Kew and you can see it has this beautiful weeping habit which we will try and replicate over the next few years of training. Adriana got this for 8 pounds from the garden centre. She’s going to take it out of the pot and work on the nebari. You start working on the nebari from the top and move down. Move away soil with a chopstick and then gently cut away the roots that have been exposed. Brush the trunk and the nebari to remove any soil and moss that may have collected on the trunk. The trunk is the oldest part of the tree and by exposing it properly, you will show off the age of the bonsai as you are creating it.

She’s working on removing some of the bigger roots at the moment. Tapering the root ball so that it has a slope to the centre of the tree. Adriana carefully measures the depth of the pot and the width of the pot to ensure that she has the root ball to the right size. She would mark out the areas that she needs to cut away although keeping in mind that there is one centimetre space between the root ball and the pot surface. She uses little tags to mark where she’s going to cut to. Because this is a peat based potting mix from the garden centre, it’s actually quite easily done. But with normal bonsai soils, it’s a little bit more tedious but nevertheless, the same instructions have to be followed.

What about that Mark? Is that too high? I would go down one centimetre, one and a half centimetre because you’ve got to put soil in it. And then that height is more or less what you want it to be. I’m going to open it a bit more here, as it grows. That pot is absolutely perfect for it. Adriana adds a thin layer of soil at the base of the pot and then makes a little mound in the centre. She places the root ball in it, jiggles it and fills it up with soil. And then ties the tie wires that we’ve had in the pot. She first hand ties it and cuts away the excess and then ties it with the jin plier to make sure that there is no slack in the tree.

However, this is a relatively tall tree in the pot and it will need additional support while the roots extend into the new soil after which it will be fine. Towards the end of the video, you will see how we provide the additional support. Adriana is using the jin pliers now to tighten the wire and remove any slack between the soil and the wire. Adriana is topping up the surface with some fresh soil.

The soil will provide a new area for fresh roots at the top to grow. After a quick dunking, she is adding a thin layer of sphagnum moss onto the soil. The sphagnum moss helps with retaining moisture in the pot and also ensures that the topsoil doesn’t run away when you water it. After the sphagnum moss has been done, she will add green moss onto it at a later stage.

She now flattens it down with a spatula to have a nice even gradient from the top of the pot to the top of the nebari, the rim of the pot. And it takes a little bit of doing but the end result is And it takes a little bit of doing but the end result is a very clean, freshly, nicely done pot. And that’s what we’re looking for. She’s now tying the additional guide wires to ensure that the bonsai is held firmly in the pot so that there is no chance of even the slightest bit of movement once it has settled into it. Adriana is using jute twine to provide the additional support for the tree and this stage is quite essential. Makes the tree much stronger. If you do not add these guide wires on a tall tree like this, the tree tends to move with the breeze and the watering and its recovery can take much longer. But there we are. Here is the end result of the day’s work. It’s a nice-looking tree and it will develop into a weeping style as we go along.

The top branches will be curved down and wired down or weighted down depending on which approach Adriana takes. Thank you for watching. We hope you liked the video. If you did, give us a thumbs up, otherwise there’s the other thumbs. But either way, do subscribe and we hope to see you again soon. Thank you for watching. This is Mark D’Cruz signing out. .

How to make bonsai tree Fuji Cherry or Prunus incisa Kojo-no-mai Bonsai Trees From Nursery Stock

 Hello folks welcome to Ma-Ke Bonsai. This is Mark D’Cruz. Today, I have Adriana with me and we’re going to pot this Fuji Cherry which make beautiful bonsais. This particular picture is of a tree at Kew and you can see it has this beautiful weeping habit which we will try and replicate over the next few years of training. Adriana got this for 8 pounds from the garden centre. She’s going to take it out of the pot and work on the nebari. You start working on the nebari from the top and move down. Move away soil with a chopstick and then gently cut away the roots that have been exposed.

Brush the trunk and the nebari to remove any soil and moss that may have collected on the trunk. The trunk is the oldest part of the tree and by exposing it properly, you will show off the age of the bonsai as you are creating it. She’s working on removing some of the bigger roots at the moment. Tapering the root ball so that it has a slope to the centre of the tree. Adriana carefully measures the depth of the pot and the width of the pot to ensure that she has the root ball to the right size. She would mark out the areas that she needs to cut away although keeping in mind that there is one centimetre space between the root ball and the pot surface. She uses little tags to mark where she’s going to cut to. Because this is a peat based potting mix from the garden centre, it’s actually quite easily done. But with normal bonsai soils, it’s a little bit more tedious but nevertheless, the same instructions have to be followed. What about that Mark? Is that too high? I would go down one centimetre, one and a half centimetre because you’ve got to put soil in it.

And then that height is more or less what you want it to be. I’m going to open it a bit more here, as it grows. That pot is absolutely perfect for it. Adriana adds a thin layer of soil at the base of the pot and then makes a little mound in the centre. She places the root ball in it, jiggles it and fills it up with soil. And then ties the tie wires that we’ve had in the pot. She first hand ties it and cuts away the excess and then ties it with the jin plier to make sure that there is no slack in the tree.

However, this is a relatively tall tree in the pot and it will need additional support while the roots extend into the new soil after which it will be fine. Towards the end of the video, you will see how we provide the additional support. Adriana is using the jin pliers now to tighten the wire and remove any slack between the soil and the wire. Adriana is topping up the surface with some fresh soil. The soil will provide a new area for fresh roots at the top to grow. After a quick dunking, she is adding a thin layer of sphagnum moss onto the soil.

The sphagnum moss helps with retaining moisture in the pot and also ensures that the topsoil doesn’t run away when you water it. After the sphagnum moss has been done, she will add green moss onto it at a later stage. She now flattens it down with a spatula to have a nice even gradient from the top of the pot to the top of the nebari, the rim of the pot. And it takes a little bit of doing but the end result is And it takes a little bit of doing but the end result is a very clean, freshly, nicely done pot. And that’s what we’re looking for. She’s now tying the additional guide wires to ensure that the bonsai is held firmly in the pot so that there is no chance of even the slightest bit of movement once it has settled into it.

Adriana is using jute twine to provide the additional support for the tree and this stage is quite essential. Makes the tree much stronger. If you do not add these guide wires on a tall tree like this, the tree tends to move with the breeze and the watering and its recovery can take much longer. But there we are. Here is the end result of the day’s work.

It’s a nice-looking tree and it will develop into a weeping style as we go along. The top branches will be curved down and wired down or weighted down depending on which approach Adriana takes. Thank you for watching. We hope you liked the video. If you did, give us a thumbs up, otherwise there’s the other thumbs. But either way, do subscribe and we hope to see you again soon. Thank you for watching. This is Mark D’Cruz signing out. .

18) Flowering Crab Apple Bonsai Tree Specimen from Field Grown Bonsai Stock

 Hello bonsai enthusiasts. In this video, we’re going to repot a Crab Apple. This particular one is about 21 years old. It’s been field grown for 18 years and has been in this black pot for about three years. It’s now pot bound and it’s time to repot into a bonsai pot. It’s got a lot of features and it’s nicely branched out and it would make a lovely bonsai. We start off, I guess, by knocking the pot off. Generally, you thump the side of the pot and then thump the top of the pot off to help dislodge it from the root ball. Use a stainless steel dibber or even a wooden dibber to help remove soil from the top of the surface. Use a sharp root shear and root cutters to help you with removing the finer roots and the larger roots.

Shape the root ball so that it tapers gently towards the soil. Remove any large, ugly roots and work your way, all the way to the bottom of the pot, working gently and slowly. While using the chopstick, try not to use it vertically, but use it horizontally so that you’re not digging into the root ball. Rather, moving bit by bit away. You may have to use a chisel and mallet to try and remove some of the larger roots or help shape the nebari properly. I’m using a half an inch gorge in this particular, half an inch gorge chisel in this particular section. It’s very effective at tapering nebaris. You then work your way all around the root ball cutting off any large roots as you work around. Make sure that the root ball doesn’t disintegrate. Keep it firm and solid all the time and this is quite a nicely shaped nebari. It’s nicely tapered and remove down to the bottom of the root ball. We’re now ready to pot on. This pot has been nicely meshed out and wires have been installed in the pot.

That will help us bind the tree into the pot. This is a Japanese blue pot, oval shaped to help accentuate the feminineness of the Crab Apple. It’s a pot bellied shape so it adds value to the overall aesthetic of the tree. I’m using a mixture of Akadama and pumice in the soil that I’m using for the tree. It’s granular, 3 – 6 mm. You make a little mound in the centre of the pot and then use the, place it so that it fits in the centre of the pot, both along the length and the breadth of the pot, and the nebari should be just slightly above the pot surface. Fill up the pot with soil and then use a mallet so that the soil falls properly into the pot and all the empty spaces are filled out, Top up wherever necessary and gradually process it. The tree is now ready, it’s quite an attractive bonsai. I hope you enjoyed the show. .

HIBISCUS BONSAI Step-1, Grow in Just Three years from Cuttings, Be the Creator, Nov.18

Within coming three years ….. do you want to be a creator of a bonsai like this? Then watch this video tutorial ….. Obviously till the end. Easiest Way to make Hibiscus Bonsai, …. Today I’m going to share with you. Namastey This is Samar … welcomes you to Be The CREATOR Channel To make Hibiscus bonsai in the shortest time …. the first step would be ….. to collect a plant which has …. a thicker trunk. You can take nursery plant, you can make plant through air-layering your self …. or … you can grow plant through cutting propagation. Here I start with cuttings. You must choose a hardwood cutting like this. Hibiscus ….. cuttings roots easily but to propagate hardwood cuttings you have to …. start from early Monsoon I’ve taken 3 cuttings …. these are of Pink variety. This small terracotta pot is …. enough for their rooting Soil I’ll use is … mixture of leaf compost and garden soil … in 2 : 1 ratio. There’s no need of rooting hormone for hibiscus.

It roots naturally very well. Drainage hole must be clear. No waterlog should be there. After drying the top soil …. I’ll water it. Within about 14 to 21 days it roots. And new shoots start sprouting Couple of months … growing them in the same pot I’ve to … transplant them. Best time to repot is late Monsoon. I’ve chosen Pink variety because …. it continuously …. blooms and it’s leaves are … smaller than other varieties. All three cuttings propagated well I’ll grow two of these and … third one, I’ll gift my cousin Let remove them from pot. Well grown root ball. I’ll separate all the three plants. I’ll use this plastic pot to train them for next one year. I arranged 6 drainage hole under. And soil is same … garden soil & leaf compost mixture. A little root trim. this is tropical Hibiscus. In hot climate it blooms regularly. If you are from cold climate then … you should take perennial Hibiscus variety. After potting …. strong watering. After a week under the shade, then I’ll …. keep it under sun again.

on coming February I’ve to work on it again. It has settled in new pot well. Leaves turned to deep green. And blooming regularly too. I’ve crossed the first step to make a Hibiscus bonsai. Second step in next February. The work to do on it then …. also I’ll share with you That’s all for now … see you on next video … till then Goodbye. Thanks for watching. .