Field Grown Bonsai

Bonsai Trees – Chinese Elm Bonsai Forest Field Grown Part 3 | mikbonsai | Bonsai Tips

Today I’m working on Chinese Elms, these were field grown in southeast England and the trunks were chopped and they were put together in a group planting I have pruned them previously and today we are going to repeat the process Hello everyone this is Iqbal Khan and today I’m working on this Chinese Elm field grown trees they have been planted in a group planting and I had pruned them a few times and they were just stumps when I started and the branches are coming along quite nicely and also they are thickening up very well. I have made a start and am now working on this side of the tree and these branches I have allowed them to really grow long and then prune them right back that way we end up with thicker branches and the ramification is better so now just going in and removing these thick branches and these again I don’t throw them away I will be propagating these to grow a little Chinese Elm trees so I’ll carry on with this and we’ll catch up shortly.

I have pruned the right hand side and the other side needs to be done. You can see the difference how different it looks the right side compared to the left side so now start working on the other side I have now turned the tree round and I will be working on this area here and I will explain the directional pruning method shortly after I have removed a few more of these branches. I am making very good progress with the pruning and now I will remove this branch from the top and I have explained previously why I let these branches grow so long the idea is if they were only, say this long and I prune them out end up with a very thin branch whereas letting them grow long I end up with a much thicker branch when it’s pruned and now I want to talk about the styling of these trees they will not be wired the branches will not be wired in any way whatsoever and I’ll be using the clip in grow and directional pruning method when the branches grow all the energy goes to the end and the branch gets longer and longer and by reducing it and pruning it the energy which previously went to the leader and pushed it to grow is stopped as soon as this is pruned and the energy then it goes to the node between the leaf and the cut branch and the new growth comes from here and that is called directional pruning if I wanted the new growth to go in this direction I would cut it to here and the new growth will go in the direction that the leaf is pointing.

I have completed the pruning of this group planting and also removed a lot of dead branches and we just zoom out and – that’s the foliage of the tree, is much thinner and lighter and there were quite a lot of dead branches and that was because the light couldn’t get through and now the light will be able to get through and hopefully it will progress on to becoming a decent group planting. This is my field grown Chinese elm group planting of seven trees. I’ll give it a quick turn, that is the front, the taller trees at the front and the smaller ones at the back that’s the back of the trees and that is where started. That’s all for now. Thanks for watching and to watch more please subscribe and ring the bell so you won’t miss anything. This is Iqbal Khan for mikbonsai in West London and now for the afterthought last night I went out with the wife for a drink and I said I love you.

She asked is that you or the beer talking. I said it’s me talking to the beer. You dig ! .

Bonsai Trees – Chinese Elm Bonsai Forest Field Grown Part 3 | mikbonsai | Bonsai Tips

Today I’m working on Chinese Elms, these were field grown in southeast England and the trunks were chopped and they were put together in a group planting I have pruned them previously and today we are going to repeat the process Hello everyone this is Iqbal Khan and today I’m working on this Chinese Elm field grown trees they have been planted in a group planting and I had pruned them a few times and they were just stumps when I started and the branches are coming along quite nicely and also they are thickening up very well. I have made a start and am now working on this side of the tree and these branches I have allowed them to really grow long and then prune them right back that way we end up with thicker branches and the ramification is better so now just going in and removing these thick branches and these again I don’t throw them away I will be propagating these to grow a little Chinese Elm trees so I’ll carry on with this and we’ll catch up shortly.

I have pruned the right hand side and the other side needs to be done. You can see the difference how different it looks the right side compared to the left side so now start working on the other side I have now turned the tree round and I will be working on this area here and I will explain the directional pruning method shortly after I have removed a few more of these branches. I am making very good progress with the pruning and now I will remove this branch from the top and I have explained previously why I let these branches grow so long the idea is if they were only, say this long and I prune them out end up with a very thin branch whereas letting them grow long I end up with a much thicker branch when it’s pruned and now I want to talk about the styling of these trees they will not be wired the branches will not be wired in any way whatsoever and I’ll be using the clip in grow and directional pruning method when the branches grow all the energy goes to the end and the branch gets longer and longer and by reducing it and pruning it the energy which previously went to the leader and pushed it to grow is stopped as soon as this is pruned and the energy then it goes to the node between the leaf and the cut branch and the new growth comes from here and that is called directional pruning if I wanted the new growth to go in this direction I would cut it to here and the new growth will go in the direction that the leaf is pointing.

I have completed the pruning of this group planting and also removed a lot of dead branches and we just zoom out and – that’s the foliage of the tree, is much thinner and lighter and there were quite a lot of dead branches and that was because the light couldn’t get through and now the light will be able to get through and hopefully it will progress on to becoming a decent group planting. This is my field grown Chinese elm group planting of seven trees.

I’ll give it a quick turn, that is the front, the taller trees at the front and the smaller ones at the back that’s the back of the trees and that is where started. That’s all for now. Thanks for watching and to watch more please subscribe and ring the bell so you won’t miss anything. This is Iqbal Khan for mikbonsai in West London and now for the afterthought last night I went out with the wife for a drink and I said I love you. She asked is that you or the beer talking. I said it’s me talking to the beer. You dig ! .

18) Flowering Crab Apple Bonsai Tree Specimen from Field Grown Bonsai Stock

 Hello bonsai enthusiasts. In this video, we’re going to repot a Crab Apple. This particular one is about 21 years old. It’s been field grown for 18 years and has been in this black pot for about three years. It’s now pot bound and it’s time to repot into a bonsai pot. It’s got a lot of features and it’s nicely branched out and it would make a lovely bonsai. We start off, I guess, by knocking the pot off. Generally, you thump the side of the pot and then thump the top of the pot off to help dislodge it from the root ball. Use a stainless steel dibber or even a wooden dibber to help remove soil from the top of the surface. Use a sharp root shear and root cutters to help you with removing the finer roots and the larger roots.

Shape the root ball so that it tapers gently towards the soil. Remove any large, ugly roots and work your way, all the way to the bottom of the pot, working gently and slowly. While using the chopstick, try not to use it vertically, but use it horizontally so that you’re not digging into the root ball. Rather, moving bit by bit away. You may have to use a chisel and mallet to try and remove some of the larger roots or help shape the nebari properly. I’m using a half an inch gorge in this particular, half an inch gorge chisel in this particular section. It’s very effective at tapering nebaris. You then work your way all around the root ball cutting off any large roots as you work around. Make sure that the root ball doesn’t disintegrate. Keep it firm and solid all the time and this is quite a nicely shaped nebari. It’s nicely tapered and remove down to the bottom of the root ball. We’re now ready to pot on. This pot has been nicely meshed out and wires have been installed in the pot.

That will help us bind the tree into the pot. This is a Japanese blue pot, oval shaped to help accentuate the feminineness of the Crab Apple. It’s a pot bellied shape so it adds value to the overall aesthetic of the tree. I’m using a mixture of Akadama and pumice in the soil that I’m using for the tree. It’s granular, 3 – 6 mm. You make a little mound in the centre of the pot and then use the, place it so that it fits in the centre of the pot, both along the length and the breadth of the pot, and the nebari should be just slightly above the pot surface. Fill up the pot with soil and then use a mallet so that the soil falls properly into the pot and all the empty spaces are filled out, Top up wherever necessary and gradually process it. The tree is now ready, it’s quite an attractive bonsai. I hope you enjoyed the show. .