chinese elm

Indoor Bonsai – Bonsai Trees for Beginners – Indoor Bonsai Care मार्क बोन्साई 03

 My name is Mark D’Cruz of Ma-Ke Bonsai and I’m going to talk to you about indoor bonsai care. There are effectively, over time we kind of learned that there’s nine different conditions that need to be met. First of all, light. Light is crucial to bonsais and often, without light, bonsais will perish. They will die slowly but they will die. Growing it on a window like this, a nice big bay window, ideally, it should be a south facing window, but if you don’t have one, then any facing window is good. For some species you may need to add extra light in which case you use a light like this. This particular light uses a white light of 64,000 Kelvin which is ideal for growing bonsai. The next thing that you need to consider is of course water. Plants, like outdoor plants, need to be watered regularly when they are dry to the touch. Water them like you would do to outdoor plants. Ideally I would dunk them. Give them a dunking in a basin or a bucket. That helps to make sure that all the bowls are full.

Another important factor to consider in growing trees indoors is heat. Now in a modern home like ours in the UK, that’s not really much of a problem because central heating takes care of heating in winter time. The only consideration is just to make sure that you do not place your bonsai directly over the heat source like, for example, a radiator or something like that, in which case, the dry heat from the radiator is going to kill the bonsai.

Bonsais need to be cooler in the night than during the day but not too cold. Many times bonsais will get too cold in the night so you need to monitor the temperature. Above 6 degrees is tolerable. Below 6 degrees gets difficult for the bonsai in the night. Plants need humidity. If you have a dry room which rooms get very dry with the central heating, the plants will suffer quite considerably.

So that’s why we have humidity trays under each of the bonsais. That provides a little microclimate for the tree so that it manages to deal with the humidity. Bonsais need to have air circulating around them. So if you put a bonsai in a place where there is no air circulation, eventually what happens is that fungus and other pests settle on it and it gets damaged, and it will die because of over fungus on the tree. Feeding and fertilizing. Use a balanced fertilizer 4/4/4 strength of 6/6/6. If you’re using a liquid fertilizer, feed every two weeks. If you’re using a pellet-type fertiliser, feed every two months or when the pellets disappear. Just like outdoor trees, indoor trees will suffer from from pests and disease. You need to keep a lookout for them. Indoor trees, because there’s a lack of circulation can suffer from pests quite often.

Scale is quite a problem indoors as is aphids and spider mites. Bonsai pots and trees need to be kept clean. You need to regularly clean them out, brush them out so that if there’s any dead matter in the trees, remove any dead wood is removed, any dead leaves are removed so that circulation is always encouraged by cleaning up the thing. Keep the top of the pot clean because then no bugs and no pests will settle in the dead matter that’s on top of the soil. And finally, dormancy. All trees need dormancy. They need to rest. Another thing to remember is that if you are growing, like I am here on the window sill, in the winter time, do not close the curtains over the plants. The warm air from the room will not come onto the plants and then the tree will just suffer from the cold air that comes in from the outside, and the coolness that comes out.

And that’s how you look after indoor bonsais. .

01) How to Care for Chinese Elm Bonsai – Bonsai Trees for Beginners Series मार्क बोन्साई

My name is Mark D’Cruz of Ma-Ke Bonsai and I’m going to talk to you about Chinese elms and their care. Chinese elms are by far the largest number of bonsai sold in the UK, in Europe and most probably in the world. You can identify Chinese Elms by their small leaves. Their leaves are about two to six centimeters long. They are serrated, they have teeth marks all around the edges, and all the bonsai, the branching can be very very fine, which is what mature Chinese Elms look like and it’s excellent quality. Chinese Elms come in many different sizes from small 15 centimetre ones to medium size, 45 centimetres, to the larger ones which are about two feet tall. You place a Chinese Elm, if it’s going indoors, by a window sill when it needs a lot of light and it can take variations in temperature quite well. If it is grown outdoors, the Chinese Elm is very versatile.

It can be grown from semi shade to full sunny position, and when it’s grown indoors, the watering is minimal but the plant has always to be kept damp but not allowed to dry out and at the same time, not allowed to be waterlogged. If it is outdoors, the watering is a little bit more versatile but again, it doesn’t like being dried out totally or being constantly wet. If it dries out, the tree can very easily shed all its leaves, although it’s a forgiving tree and it will bounce back quite regularly.

Having over watered a Chinese Elm can be quite problematic because it will die slowly and it takes about six months to die and you don’t even know that you’re killing the tree because of over watering. Chinese Elms need to be groomed regularly and you prune it when the leaves have grown to about six or seven leaves long and you cut it back to just leaving two leaf nodes. You feed it every two to, every 15 days, every two weeks, If you’re using a liquid fertiliser If you’re using a solid fertiliser, or a pellet based fertiliser, you’d feed it every two months.

When you repot a Chinese Elm, you use a well draining soil. At Market Bonsai, we tend to use Akadama and Pumice and we use it in the ratio of 2:1. Two parts of Akadama and one part of Pumice Chinese Elms propagate very easily. You can propagate them from cuttings They have a very high success rate of propagating. And that’s how you care for Chinese Elms. .

Bonsai | Bonsai Repotting | Chinese elm Bonsai | Bonsai Trees for Beginners//GREEN PLANTS

Welcome to my channel in this video i’m going to show you the update of Chinese elm bonsai tree after one year i’m going to repot this bonsai first i just remove the moss from the top soil next loosen the soil and remove the old soil carefully remove the tree from its pot pruning the long roots and side roots its a new cement bonsai pot i just select for my Chinese elm bonsai now add fine gravels in the base layer of the pot for good drainage next add the bonsai soil and spread evenly next place the tree in right position next add the remaining bonsai soil and cover the roots with soil next remove the air pockets from the soil using a this stick next spray the water to the soil then replace the moss and add colored stones on the top layer of soil this will help to keep the soil moisture and also give beautiful look after re potting pruning the leaves its a maintenance pruning pour the water twice a week and keep in partial shade and bright sun light area thanks for watching

Indoor Bonsai – Bonsai Trees for Beginners – Indoor Bonsai Care मार्क बोन्साई 03

 My name is Mark D’Cruz of Ma-Ke Bonsai and I’m going to talk to you about indoor bonsai care. There are effectively, over time we kind of learned that there’s nine different conditions that need to be met. First of all, light. Light is crucial to bonsais and often, without light, bonsais will perish. They will die slowly but they will die. Growing it on a window like this, a nice big bay window, ideally, it should be a south facing window, but if you don’t have one, then any facing window is good.

For some species you may need to add extra light in which case you use a light like this. This particular light uses a white light of 64,000 Kelvin which is ideal for growing bonsai. The next thing that you need to consider is of course water. Plants, like outdoor plants, need to be watered regularly when they are dry to the touch. Water them like you would do to outdoor plants. Ideally I would dunk them. Give them a dunking in a basin or a bucket. That helps to make sure that all the bowls are full. Another important factor to consider in growing trees indoors is heat. Now in a modern home like ours in the UK, that’s not really much of a problem because central heating takes care of heating in winter time. The only consideration is just to make sure that you do not place your bonsai directly over the heat source like, for example, a radiator or something like that, in which case, the dry heat from the radiator is going to kill the bonsai.

Bonsais need to be cooler in the night than during the day but not too cold. Many times bonsais will get too cold in the night so you need to monitor the temperature. Above 6 degrees is tolerable. Below 6 degrees gets difficult for the bonsai in the night. Plants need humidity. If you have a dry room which rooms get very dry with the central heating, the plants will suffer quite considerably. So that’s why we have humidity trays under each of the bonsais. That provides a little microclimate for the tree so that it manages to deal with the humidity.

Bonsais need to have air circulating around them. So if you put a bonsai in a place where there is no air circulation, eventually what happens is that fungus and other pests settle on it and it gets damaged, and it will die because of over fungus on the tree. Feeding and fertilizing. Use a balanced fertilizer 4/4/4 strength of 6/6/6. If you’re using a liquid fertilizer, feed every two weeks. If you’re using a pellet-type fertiliser, feed every two months or when the pellets disappear. Just like outdoor trees, indoor trees will suffer from from pests and disease. You need to keep a lookout for them. Indoor trees, because there’s a lack of circulation can suffer from pests quite often. Scale is quite a problem indoors as is aphids and spider mites. Bonsai pots and trees need to be kept clean. You need to regularly clean them out, brush them out so that if there’s any dead matter in the trees, remove any dead wood is removed, any dead leaves are removed so that circulation is always encouraged by cleaning up the thing.

Keep the top of the pot clean because then no bugs and no pests will settle in the dead matter that’s on top of the soil. And finally, dormancy. All trees need dormancy. They need to rest. Another thing to remember is that if you are growing, like I am here on the window sill, in the winter time, do not close the curtains over the plants. The warm air from the room will not come onto the plants and then the tree will just suffer from the cold air that comes in from the outside, and the coolness that comes out. And that’s how you look after indoor bonsais. .

Indoor Bonsai – Bonsai Trees for Beginners – Indoor Bonsai Care मार्क बोन्साई 03

 My name is Mark D’Cruz of Ma-Ke Bonsai and I’m going to talk to you about indoor bonsai care. There are effectively, over time we kind of learned that there’s nine different conditions that need to be met. First of all, light. Light is crucial to bonsais and often, without light, bonsais will perish. They will die slowly but they will die. Growing it on a window like this, a nice big bay window, ideally, it should be a south facing window, but if you don’t have one, then any facing window is good. For some species you may need to add extra light in which case you use a light like this. This particular light uses a white light of 64,000 Kelvin which is ideal for growing bonsai.

The next thing that you need to consider is of course water. Plants, like outdoor plants, need to be watered regularly when they are dry to the touch. Water them like you would do to outdoor plants. Ideally I would dunk them. Give them a dunking in a basin or a bucket. That helps to make sure that all the bowls are full. Another important factor to consider in growing trees indoors is heat. Now in a modern home like ours in the UK, that’s not really much of a problem because central heating takes care of heating in winter time.

The only consideration is just to make sure that you do not place your bonsai directly over the heat source like, for example, a radiator or something like that, in which case, the dry heat from the radiator is going to kill the bonsai. Bonsais need to be cooler in the night than during the day but not too cold. Many times bonsais will get too cold in the night so you need to monitor the temperature. Above 6 degrees is tolerable. Below 6 degrees gets difficult for the bonsai in the night. Plants need humidity. If you have a dry room which rooms get very dry with the central heating, the plants will suffer quite considerably. So that’s why we have humidity trays under each of the bonsais. That provides a little microclimate for the tree so that it manages to deal with the humidity.

Bonsais need to have air circulating around them. So if you put a bonsai in a place where there is no air circulation, eventually what happens is that fungus and other pests settle on it and it gets damaged, and it will die because of over fungus on the tree. Feeding and fertilizing. Use a balanced fertilizer 4/4/4 strength of 6/6/6. If you’re using a liquid fertilizer, feed every two weeks. If you’re using a pellet-type fertiliser, feed every two months or when the pellets disappear. Just like outdoor trees, indoor trees will suffer from from pests and disease. You need to keep a lookout for them. Indoor trees, because there’s a lack of circulation can suffer from pests quite often. Scale is quite a problem indoors as is aphids and spider mites. Bonsai pots and trees need to be kept clean. You need to regularly clean them out, brush them out so that if there’s any dead matter in the trees, remove any dead wood is removed, any dead leaves are removed so that circulation is always encouraged by cleaning up the thing.

Keep the top of the pot clean because then no bugs and no pests will settle in the dead matter that’s on top of the soil. And finally, dormancy. All trees need dormancy. They need to rest. Another thing to remember is that if you are growing, like I am here on the window sill, in the winter time, do not close the curtains over the plants. The warm air from the room will not come onto the plants and then the tree will just suffer from the cold air that comes in from the outside, and the coolness that comes out. And that’s how you look after indoor bonsais. .