Bonsai Trees for Beginners

How to make bonsai Olive or European Olive Bonsai Tree with Ginta bonsai trees #95

Quite good. Yeah, and near the leaves, underneath the branches. Ok. So if there’s a branch, obviously the leaves need to come out. It’s not a stem, it’s a branch. So the stems have leaves and the branches don’t. Branches have other branches on them, no stems. I think they’re too many as well. Shall we take off this one? Actually there are already too many which means something has to go. I think that one has to go, this one. Right, first let’s remove the leaf so we can see the tree, as there’s too many leaves around. So now we can see some branches emerging. I think this one has to go. No, because that is coming out outwards nicely, can you see? So that forms a nice, this guy, first of all is too ugly. Why is too ugly? Because it is straight absolutely, there is no ramification in it.

The little ones are always what we want because bonsai is all about small branches so we try and keep them. There are three coming out of here so… So take the biggest one out and leave the two smaller ones. How is it looking? It’s looking good. Ok, empty out your tray now. .

How to Grow Croton Bonsai | 2 Croton Bonsai Repotting | Bonsai Trees for Beginners //GREEN PLANTS

Welcome to my channel now i’m going to show you Croton bonsai re-potting it is a three years old Croton bonsai this bonsai needs re potting because roots have filled the container and it has overgrown roots hold the soil together in a pretty tight loosen up the soil remove the tree carefully from its pot see the roots are almost overgrowing it is time to re pot removing the old soil carefully use bonsai root rake to carefully remove the soil if you don’t have bonsai root rake you can use chopstick or small stick to remove the soil when you are working avoid damaging the main root system and do not soak in water to remove soil because you can’t get the root ball prune all long , large and out grown roots do not prune more than 40% of all roots next i decided to replant the tree in another bonsai pot because i think the old pot haven’t enough space placing a mesh net or jute cloth piece to cover the hole now i’m just putting a thin layer of small stones in the bottom of the pot for drainage purposes then fill the new fresh bonsai soil then place the tree in position After placing the tree in the pot fill the bonsai soil this fresh soil should be worked in around and under the roots and also avoid leaving any air pockets make sure to fill all the air pockets around the roots use chopstick or any small stick and fill the air pockets after filling the soil add the stones or moss on top of the soil this will keep the soil moisture after repotting water the tree thoroughly use sprayer to water it’s an another type Croton bonsai now i’m going to repot it in another bonsai pot loosing the soil and remove the tree carefully from its pot i just use a small stick to remove the soil after removing the old soil roots pruning i just cut long and outgrown roots next repotting it in a bonsai pot covering the hole with a jute net and add the thin layer of stones and then put the bonsai soil and place the tree in the position and then add the bonsai soil after all watering to the tree with a sprayer next after repotting the trees keep them in shade for few days and then you can move them in sunny area thanks for watching

How to make bonsai tree Fuji Cherry or Prunus incisa Kojo-no-mai Bonsai Trees From Nursery Stock

 Hello folks welcome to Ma-Ke Bonsai. This is Mark D’Cruz. Today, I have Adriana with me and we’re going to pot this Fuji Cherry which make beautiful bonsais. This particular picture is of a tree at Kew and you can see it has this beautiful weeping habit which we will try and replicate over the next few years of training. Adriana got this for 8 pounds from the garden centre. She’s going to take it out of the pot and work on the nebari. You start working on the nebari from the top and move down. Move away soil with a chopstick and then gently cut away the roots that have been exposed. Brush the trunk and the nebari to remove any soil and moss that may have collected on the trunk. The trunk is the oldest part of the tree and by exposing it properly, you will show off the age of the bonsai as you are creating it.

She’s working on removing some of the bigger roots at the moment. Tapering the root ball so that it has a slope to the centre of the tree. Adriana carefully measures the depth of the pot and the width of the pot to ensure that she has the root ball to the right size. She would mark out the areas that she needs to cut away although keeping in mind that there is one centimetre space between the root ball and the pot surface. She uses little tags to mark where she’s going to cut to. Because this is a peat based potting mix from the garden centre, it’s actually quite easily done. But with normal bonsai soils, it’s a little bit more tedious but nevertheless, the same instructions have to be followed.

What about that Mark? Is that too high? I would go down one centimetre, one and a half centimetre because you’ve got to put soil in it. And then that height is more or less what you want it to be. I’m going to open it a bit more here, as it grows. That pot is absolutely perfect for it. Adriana adds a thin layer of soil at the base of the pot and then makes a little mound in the centre. She places the root ball in it, jiggles it and fills it up with soil. And then ties the tie wires that we’ve had in the pot. She first hand ties it and cuts away the excess and then ties it with the jin plier to make sure that there is no slack in the tree.

However, this is a relatively tall tree in the pot and it will need additional support while the roots extend into the new soil after which it will be fine. Towards the end of the video, you will see how we provide the additional support. Adriana is using the jin pliers now to tighten the wire and remove any slack between the soil and the wire. Adriana is topping up the surface with some fresh soil.

The soil will provide a new area for fresh roots at the top to grow. After a quick dunking, she is adding a thin layer of sphagnum moss onto the soil. The sphagnum moss helps with retaining moisture in the pot and also ensures that the topsoil doesn’t run away when you water it. After the sphagnum moss has been done, she will add green moss onto it at a later stage.

She now flattens it down with a spatula to have a nice even gradient from the top of the pot to the top of the nebari, the rim of the pot. And it takes a little bit of doing but the end result is And it takes a little bit of doing but the end result is a very clean, freshly, nicely done pot. And that’s what we’re looking for. She’s now tying the additional guide wires to ensure that the bonsai is held firmly in the pot so that there is no chance of even the slightest bit of movement once it has settled into it. Adriana is using jute twine to provide the additional support for the tree and this stage is quite essential. Makes the tree much stronger. If you do not add these guide wires on a tall tree like this, the tree tends to move with the breeze and the watering and its recovery can take much longer. But there we are. Here is the end result of the day’s work. It’s a nice-looking tree and it will develop into a weeping style as we go along.

The top branches will be curved down and wired down or weighted down depending on which approach Adriana takes. Thank you for watching. We hope you liked the video. If you did, give us a thumbs up, otherwise there’s the other thumbs. But either way, do subscribe and we hope to see you again soon. Thank you for watching. This is Mark D’Cruz signing out. .

How to make bonsai tree Fuji Cherry or Prunus incisa Kojo-no-mai Bonsai Trees From Nursery Stock

 Hello folks welcome to Ma-Ke Bonsai. This is Mark D’Cruz. Today, I have Adriana with me and we’re going to pot this Fuji Cherry which make beautiful bonsais. This particular picture is of a tree at Kew and you can see it has this beautiful weeping habit which we will try and replicate over the next few years of training. Adriana got this for 8 pounds from the garden centre. She’s going to take it out of the pot and work on the nebari. You start working on the nebari from the top and move down. Move away soil with a chopstick and then gently cut away the roots that have been exposed.

Brush the trunk and the nebari to remove any soil and moss that may have collected on the trunk. The trunk is the oldest part of the tree and by exposing it properly, you will show off the age of the bonsai as you are creating it. She’s working on removing some of the bigger roots at the moment. Tapering the root ball so that it has a slope to the centre of the tree. Adriana carefully measures the depth of the pot and the width of the pot to ensure that she has the root ball to the right size. She would mark out the areas that she needs to cut away although keeping in mind that there is one centimetre space between the root ball and the pot surface. She uses little tags to mark where she’s going to cut to. Because this is a peat based potting mix from the garden centre, it’s actually quite easily done. But with normal bonsai soils, it’s a little bit more tedious but nevertheless, the same instructions have to be followed. What about that Mark? Is that too high? I would go down one centimetre, one and a half centimetre because you’ve got to put soil in it.

And then that height is more or less what you want it to be. I’m going to open it a bit more here, as it grows. That pot is absolutely perfect for it. Adriana adds a thin layer of soil at the base of the pot and then makes a little mound in the centre. She places the root ball in it, jiggles it and fills it up with soil. And then ties the tie wires that we’ve had in the pot. She first hand ties it and cuts away the excess and then ties it with the jin plier to make sure that there is no slack in the tree.

However, this is a relatively tall tree in the pot and it will need additional support while the roots extend into the new soil after which it will be fine. Towards the end of the video, you will see how we provide the additional support. Adriana is using the jin pliers now to tighten the wire and remove any slack between the soil and the wire. Adriana is topping up the surface with some fresh soil. The soil will provide a new area for fresh roots at the top to grow. After a quick dunking, she is adding a thin layer of sphagnum moss onto the soil.

The sphagnum moss helps with retaining moisture in the pot and also ensures that the topsoil doesn’t run away when you water it. After the sphagnum moss has been done, she will add green moss onto it at a later stage. She now flattens it down with a spatula to have a nice even gradient from the top of the pot to the top of the nebari, the rim of the pot. And it takes a little bit of doing but the end result is And it takes a little bit of doing but the end result is a very clean, freshly, nicely done pot. And that’s what we’re looking for. She’s now tying the additional guide wires to ensure that the bonsai is held firmly in the pot so that there is no chance of even the slightest bit of movement once it has settled into it.

Adriana is using jute twine to provide the additional support for the tree and this stage is quite essential. Makes the tree much stronger. If you do not add these guide wires on a tall tree like this, the tree tends to move with the breeze and the watering and its recovery can take much longer. But there we are. Here is the end result of the day’s work.

It’s a nice-looking tree and it will develop into a weeping style as we go along. The top branches will be curved down and wired down or weighted down depending on which approach Adriana takes. Thank you for watching. We hope you liked the video. If you did, give us a thumbs up, otherwise there’s the other thumbs. But either way, do subscribe and we hope to see you again soon. Thank you for watching. This is Mark D’Cruz signing out. .

How to Grow Orange Bonsai | Calamondin Chinese Orange | Bonsai Trees for Beginners //GREEN PLANTS

Growing orange bonsai from air layering these are already prepared orange tree air layerings Cut the air layers, from the bottom of the polyethylene remove the polyethylene be careful do not cut the roots now place the root ball in the pot and fill it with potting soil press it gently and water it after 60 days now ready to re pot this orange plant get the tree out of the pot remove the soil this is the hand made clay pot in this pot now i’m going to repot the orange plant put the stones first layer these stones will provide better drainage to the plant add the bonsai soil fill the soil in half of the pot place the tree in soil place the moss on top of the soil add the stones and cover the soil this helps to keep the soil moisture and also when you are watering to the bonsai tree the stones protect the soil and roots from damages watering to the orange bonsai tree pour the water for every two days after finished re potting

How to make bonsai Juniper Bonsai from Nursery Stock – Bonsai Trees for Beginners Series #161

 Welcome to Ma-ke Bonsai. This is Mark D’ Cruz. Today, we’re going to plant juniper that Bogdan has got from a garden centre. He paid 22 pounds for this and he’s planted it in this large garden pot for a couple of years and it’s gained a nice set of roots at the bottom. It’s now ready to be bonsaied, I guess. That’s the phase that we’re looking for. We start by working on the top to find where the nebari is. We turn the tree around to find the right angle. And the nebari will help us determine the right size. On turning the tree around, it was found that these two branches were a little bit on the low side and were not required. We decided to cut them off. And it seems that they got a nice set of roots so we will save them. We wrapped them in some sphagnum moss, tied them into a little bundle ready for repotting at a later stage. Back to pruning the roots away from the top of the sawing. We expose the nebari and work away all the fine roots that are there.

The nebari is the broadest part of the trunk and that’s what we’re looking for. We have a nice big branch that flows to one side so this is going to be a semi cascade kind of tree. We have a couple of low branches which we will remove and make into jins at a later stage. We trim away some of the branches so that we can actually see all the major branches that we will need.

We wire the bigger branches so that we can move them into position at this stage. So, now we’re ready to do some of the finer branches. And we just carry on with this till we got everything. After the wiring, we set the tree in the pot giving it the right angle that we require. We cover it with the bonsai mix which is Akadama and pumice that we use for most of our trees.

This particular size is 3 mm to 6 mm. It helps hold a lot of water so the Juniper likes a lot of water. We use it for the Juniper. Adriana ties the tree inside and then we tighten it with a jin plier. We pull and remove any gaps that that appear. There are a lot of videos that will show you the details on how to repot a bonsai. As with applying moss or with how to wire the bonsai into the pot as well. Adriana’s giving it a quick clean now. That’s always part of the process that we go through. And then we apply green moss on to the tree. I’m now going to be jining the branches that are cut away. I remove all the cambium from the bark from the branch. I split the branch into four and then use the jin plier to strip away bits of it so that it appears that we have a natural break in the trunk.

No cut branches should appear. And there we are. This is the Juniper, nicely potted up. It’s been shaped into a semi cascade style. In a couple of years, we will give it another bit of styling and make it a little bit more in keeping with what we want. Thank you for watching. If you enjoyed the video, please give us a thumbs up. And if not, well there’s the other icon. And do subscribe. We add videos regularly. Thank you. .

How to Grow Mother of Thousands Plant Like a Bonsai PART-1 (experiments) //GREEN PLANTS

Welcome to my channel today i’m going to show growing mother of thousands plant like a bonsai it’s a succulent plant and also known as kalanchoe daigremontiana here the one year old plants i’m taking out the plant from the pot we can see its roots and leaves that have outgrown from its pot we should only repot the plant when it outgrows its home then i’m just removing the old and dead leaves next i’m going to repot these plants in bonsai pot pot must have good drainage now i just place piece of jute cloth on the hole this will help to drain the water then put some stones at the bottom layer of the pot then put the soil which must be well drained and we can also use cactus soil mix then set the plant in the pot and fill the soil around it and we don’t need to prune the roots roots cutting or pruning is unnecessary now i’m putting some stones on the top layer of the soil that will help to keep the soil and keep moist and also give beautiful look we can also place moss or sand on the top soil after repotting the plants place the plants in a space that receives bright, but indirect light for at least 6 hours per day If growing the plant indoors, place close to a window or bright site of the house or office Mother of Thousands plant is a low maintenance specie, which is easy to care for and once in the correct environment low maintenance ideal for those who may not always be around Mother of Thousands plant prefers average room conditions and moist but not soggy soil and it needs good drainage when growing the plants outdoors, avoid direct afternoon sun watering to the plant after repot the plant pour water once in three days and doesn’t require frequent watering to grow

English Elm Bonsai Progression – The English Elm Bonsai Tree – Part 2

Hello everyone today we are looking at my English Elm Bonsai tree and the update is on the upper part and the lower part which were air layered and separated. The upper part is being grown as a tree on its own and the lower parts are being grown as a raft style. I last worked on it this time three years ago. So three years on the tree and the raft style are coming along quite nicely and we’ll take a look at both of them shortly. So be sure to watch the whole video. So stay tuned. Hey it’s me Iqbal Khan, if you have not yet subscribed to mikbonsai then click the subscribe button and hit the bell icon to subscribe and receive notifications as I upload new videos. This is the front and the upper part of the air layered tree and three years ago that’s when it was done and this is where I carved it exactly three years ago and as you can see it’s starting to callus over, be interesting to see what happens when it gets to the to the end I suppose it will probably go inwards and turning the tree also some carving work was done at the top and all the way down to the side and along here and all this V was created and then this bark was removed and as you can see it’s healing over quite nicely starting to callus and it won’t be too long before it’s, the callousing comes to the end of the V.

That is the top of the pot and it’s full of debris and weeds so I’m going to start tidying it up and remove all these weeds and debris these are all weeds so I’ll remove these and also the debris this that leaves not from this tree but from neighboring trees and other few bits and pieces which trees drop and I’ll be removing all these and tidy up the pot take another look at the tree and then I’ll be doing some work with the top and I’ll carry on with this and we’ll catch up shortly.

I have cleaned the soil and freed it of debris and weeds so the green that you see is a bit of moss and I’ll give it a quick turn so you can see that the pot has been thoroughly tidied up and also the actual pot has been cleaned and I’ve always maintained that the job is not done if the pot has been cleaned so that’s turning the other way and that’s the front of the tree. We are now looking into the canopy of the tree and branches which are crossing or fighting with each other I’m going to remove and in this instance it is this branch here that I’m going to remove as I want this to develop a little bit more up here so this will be removed to make room for the other one and here we go that’s it that’s out I’ll go back in and clean it up a bit more make it flush cut looks a bit better here, where as before they were too close and just too much going on and it’s also not good for the branches lower down, as the Sun doesn’t get through.

`I have made a start working on the tree at the top the canopy, reducing, removing the dead branches and then also reducing the branches to create a much better canopy so we are basically reducing that and I’ll just go round the tree and see what else needs to be done firstly removing the dead branches. I’m going to start thinning out the foliage by pruning the leaves and again using the directional pruning method so as not to do too much wiring etc to shape it. I’m continuing with the removal of the dead stumps and dead branches and also shorting the branches, I am now going to remove this part of the branch up to about here that’s that one and this lower one will go back to about there that’s off and basically to bring the tree in, tighten it up a bit more the branches are a bit too long and I like to do the work slowly take it easy and that way gives me a chance to revisit the tree from time to time and do additional work that is necessary.

I am working to create a look where the lower branches such as this one here are longer than the upper branches and gradually work my way up that’s the strategy so I’m going to reduce this first to here, then take a look, no this is virtually same sort of length so I’ll reduce it back a bit more, to about there and now this this one will be reduced as its higher than that one and we’ll do it in two phases to start with and we’ll see how that looks and this branch here we’ll reduce it to about there and it makes a very big difference although its a few inches long but as we work towards the apex the tree is being gradually pulled in and it’ll make a denser canopy and I can see it it’s already coming along quite nicely this branch here where my hand is, just above this branch here I’m going to shorten the top one again to create that layered effect so we will take this back to where there is a few leaves coming off of it so I’ll get back to about there and now that really opens up the lower branch and again the one which is doubling back, we’ll remove that part there and also leaf prune it so that give it a little bit more of a directional prune.

Stand back and take a look, little bit better, now there are other bits which are sticking out so that’s the only way to stand back have a look, this bit is sticking out so I’m gonna reduce that to about there and have another look and also prune some of this thick foliage Dead branches come off and continue with clipping and directional pruning so it grows in a certain direction continue to move up wards, now I’m going to reduce this branch to there then we have again differential in height and this one I’m going to bring down to there so the difference between that that and then that one, that will leave it at that level but the one next to it this one here I will reduce that shortly. So it’s just like a haircut these bits are sticking out so I will shorten these then take another look and see if more shortening is necessary. It’s the old carpenters rule measure twice cut once and the same principle applies here .Now looking from that angle this branch is sticking out so I’m going to take it right back to about there and then these smaller branches will take over.

I have worked my way to the apex and now it’s time to thin this part here I’m going to remove this side branch so reduce it down to where the dead branch was and then take a look Right and now reduce this one, there is a dead stub here., and remove that and then reduce this, let’s see if we reduce it in stages to there So I’m going to have a little look, stand back and see, yes that now fits in a little bit better.

Right folks there we are it’s all pruned the canopy is nice and tight and I’ll give it a quick turn so you can see it from all sides and that was a front where we started side one that’s the back, side two and that’s where we started, and the last thing that I’m going to do with this is, it’s time to feed it so I haven’t put the chicken pellets yet so these are the chicken pellets being scattered around the pot and they should keep it fed to the end of the season. if you haven’t seen the first video then there is a link in the info card at the top right-hand corner of the screen click on that and it will take you to the first video when this tree was air layered and the air layer was separated, the roots on it are just amazing.

Right folks that was the English Elm the upper part, it’s a tale of two halves and the lower part which is being grown in the raft style follows in part two so be sure to watch that. That’s all for now this is Iqbal Khan for mikbonsai in West London, until the next time. And now for the afterthought You love this . Bonsai lovers are very tolerant people they just hate bigotry, You Dig ! .

Styling bonsai tree from yamadori Lonicera collected raw material – Tree 2 – Part 4 by mikbonsai

I’m going to wire them so that these two branches like this one will move up a bit and this will move down a bit so that they become one great big pad both these branches have been widened I’m going to lower this one and raise this one lower this one slightly and we do it again by bending the wire using strength of the wire to bend it and this one’s being wrote up so they basically are looking starting to look more of a pad as opposed to being at different levels and these again and we reduced but this one I’m going to leave as is this one I think I will wire this up these two up and this one I’m going to do choir up and move it a little bit towards the camera and this one also would wire it and bring it down so the crown is more pronounced so now we will continue with this wire and this unwinding in the anti-clockwise direction and sticking very close to the branch and at a 45 degree just wire it avoiding the foliage and round it goes moving the father’s out of the way now working with the wire that of the brows that have just been wired I’m just going to bend it very very gently using the strength of the wire and then I’m gonna straighten it up from this end is starting to point downwards which I don’t want no salt quite I’m not sure dude I’ve already started wiring this branch and we continue in a clockwise direction and as it’s going to be bent in the clockwise direction so again avoiding any foliage – just wouldn’t work some of these branches are quite good and I want to retain those so except it was out of the way so positioning this where there wasn’t a pad before and so that’s that’s done that’s right nicely positioned and just shooting a few more of the branches as they are little bit too longer and we’ll see if I can do something with this one to lower this just a few centimetres perhaps an inch or so and we’ll Y trying to wire this as well now continuing to wire this pad just moving away the foliage and the branches very congested here have to use tweezers to get them out of the way some of the branches are very very fine that’ll do bend it towards the camera downwards and towards the camera so do it very very gently it’s a very thick branch and this is two things one is down and then one is towards the camera now I want to do it very very gently as they break very very brittle and they break very very easily right there we have it I’m gonna shorten this as and now shorten these branches as as bad is about this pad the lower pad is much bigger so the upper part has got to be slightly shorter and in fact we will do the same with the pads higher up so I’m going to cut this wire back to mark here and reduce this so removing paw the white partially as this part is too is too long so you’re going to reduce it to about there so reduce that to up there it was much longer and and see lots of these paths I’m going to reduce now that it’s starting to take shape this is the time to do a bit of tidy up not too sure about this branch here but we’ll leave it for now it can always be removed later because this looks quite neat and tidy and then there’s this one or a sound so I’d me I’m tempted to remove this this branch we will take it out now and it’s done then I think it looks better without that launch and this is a potential this is also a potential front and so this interesting bit here the double trunk and then fusing up here and I have removed a very big branch from here earlier that was when I first worked on it give me a quick turn and that’s the button of our front as well I will continue to grow it in this pot for a while this is a foliage that we’ve taken off today quite a lot just reveal the bonsai that was hiding unrolled all that voltage I have done fair amount and I’m pleased with the progress that I have made with this tree the this was a leader previously which I have managed to wire and turn into a small pot and this one may be the new leader basically it is no growing is thinner and also there’s a fair amount of growth up here and it’ll be far easier to form a crown with this as well and with that just finish giving it a quick turn and that’s very storage although that could be the front but on this side there’s a big contract removed a very big drought when I first started but we’ll see how it develops that’s all for now thank you watching watch more please subscribe the second account forming bonsai in Westland

18) Flowering Crab Apple Bonsai Tree Specimen from Field Grown Bonsai Stock

 Hello bonsai enthusiasts. In this video, we’re going to repot a Crab Apple. This particular one is about 21 years old. It’s been field grown for 18 years and has been in this black pot for about three years. It’s now pot bound and it’s time to repot into a bonsai pot. It’s got a lot of features and it’s nicely branched out and it would make a lovely bonsai. We start off, I guess, by knocking the pot off. Generally, you thump the side of the pot and then thump the top of the pot off to help dislodge it from the root ball. Use a stainless steel dibber or even a wooden dibber to help remove soil from the top of the surface. Use a sharp root shear and root cutters to help you with removing the finer roots and the larger roots.

Shape the root ball so that it tapers gently towards the soil. Remove any large, ugly roots and work your way, all the way to the bottom of the pot, working gently and slowly. While using the chopstick, try not to use it vertically, but use it horizontally so that you’re not digging into the root ball. Rather, moving bit by bit away. You may have to use a chisel and mallet to try and remove some of the larger roots or help shape the nebari properly. I’m using a half an inch gorge in this particular, half an inch gorge chisel in this particular section. It’s very effective at tapering nebaris. You then work your way all around the root ball cutting off any large roots as you work around. Make sure that the root ball doesn’t disintegrate. Keep it firm and solid all the time and this is quite a nicely shaped nebari. It’s nicely tapered and remove down to the bottom of the root ball. We’re now ready to pot on. This pot has been nicely meshed out and wires have been installed in the pot.

That will help us bind the tree into the pot. This is a Japanese blue pot, oval shaped to help accentuate the feminineness of the Crab Apple. It’s a pot bellied shape so it adds value to the overall aesthetic of the tree. I’m using a mixture of Akadama and pumice in the soil that I’m using for the tree. It’s granular, 3 – 6 mm. You make a little mound in the centre of the pot and then use the, place it so that it fits in the centre of the pot, both along the length and the breadth of the pot, and the nebari should be just slightly above the pot surface. Fill up the pot with soil and then use a mallet so that the soil falls properly into the pot and all the empty spaces are filled out, Top up wherever necessary and gradually process it. The tree is now ready, it’s quite an attractive bonsai. I hope you enjoyed the show. .