Bonsai tree for beginners

Bonsai Repotting – Bonsai Trees for Beginners Series #04

Hello my name is Mark D’Cruz of Ma-Ke Bonsai and with me is Jonny Gires. Today we’re going to demonstrate how to repot a bonsai (Ligistrum sinense) We have chosen a Turquoise blue pot to replace the last pot. I’m going to talk a bit about the tools we are going to use. To start off with we have a spatula to help firm down the bonsai soil we then have a jin plier and wire cutter the wire cutter is to help with remove wires that bind the tree into the pot and to replace it with new wire ties finally tie the bonsai into the pot… the sickle is very important tool because more often than not you have to the bonsai out of the pot then we have two little brushes or rather three little brushes that help us with the tidiness and cleanliness of the pot. the the plastic brushes used to clean the bark, the metal brush is use to clean the pot the coco brush is used to tidy up the surface of the pot once we have repotting it and here we have two set of scissors to help us with cutting the roots We have a root cutter this one to cut the finer roots they are very, very sharp and very strong umm..

Here we have a root cutter to cut off heavier roots within the bonsai and one of the most important tools as far as we are concerned is… what we call a bidder, its just a piece of metal some thing like a metal chopstick the chopstick that helps us with the clearing the top of the root surface the pot has a curved surface surface so it the site has got in between the the soil has got under the lip of the pot so we cannot just pull it out off the pot so we are going to going to do is cut off the bonsai from the pot this requires a bit of strenght and we are using a sickle to help us with the cutting of the soil if the root-ball is not coming out use a chop stick to help prise it out you can see the roots are massed up and it definitely needs to be repotted. as you can see there’s a substantial amount of roots, some we have already removed from the root-ball but we still have a bit more to remove cut away the roots that were removed by the sickle so first of all Johnny is going to start by clearing of the soil Johnny is going to clean the moss that is on the bark the soft nylon brush ensures the bark is not damaged but it removes all the moss that may have collected Johnny is going to remove half to 1 cm of soils from the bottom so any excessively long root are removed and cut away so we have a clean root ball at the bottom Next thing Johnny is going to do is cut out the excess root ball to fit the new pot Use the dibber to mark all round the root-ball, making sure it is centered in the pot and make sure the bonsai is centered in the pot and now its fits absolutely comfortably in the pot with enough room to accommodate the new soil For the repotting we use a special bonsai mix which in this case is a mixture of Akadama and Pumice the grain size is between 3mm and 6mm and as you can see it is a very granular mixture Place a thin layer of mix at the bottom of the pot place the bonsai on it and jiggle around till you get it in the centre of the pot the trunk has to be absolutely vertical in all directions vertical from the front and vertical from the side fill more soil in to the pot and use a rubber mallet to settle the soil into the pot this is a rubber mallet that has been softened by boiling in water we need to ensure that the tree is firmly in the pot we test by moving the trunk, if the pot and trunk move together we know the tree is firmly in the pot.

the next step is to use the spatula to firm the soil in moving all around the the pot The final step is to bind the tree into the pot with the wire is bound from one end to the other end and tightened with the jin pliers twisting it clockwise while binding the wires ensure that that they are not tied in the middle of the pot but on the far extremes of the pot as we we’ve done these two, you then cut of any excess what making sure that there is not much of a tail left Johnny then water the pot by giving it a dunking in a tub of water pot rim stays just above the surface of the water and the water rises into the pot from below and you should soon see it at the top of the pot lift the pot up and let excess water drain out Last step in in repotting is to cover the surface with with a thin layer of dried sphagnum moss the sphagnum moss protects surface root of the bonsai by not letting the pot do it too fast the last bit to do, is to ensure that the pot is cleaned up and polished Here we have Camellia Oil and an emery rubber that helps with cleaning up and finishing off the pot and that’s how we Repot A Bonsai Tree

How to make bonsai tree Fuji Cherry or Prunus incisa Kojo-no-mai Bonsai Trees From Nursery Stock

 Hello folks welcome to Ma-Ke Bonsai. This is Mark D’Cruz. Today, I have Adriana with me and we’re going to pot this Fuji Cherry which make beautiful bonsais. This particular picture is of a tree at Kew and you can see it has this beautiful weeping habit which we will try and replicate over the next few years of training. Adriana got this for 8 pounds from the garden centre. She’s going to take it out of the pot and work on the nebari.

You start working on the nebari from the top and move down. Move away soil with a chopstick and then gently cut away the roots that have been exposed. Brush the trunk and the nebari to remove any soil and moss that may have collected on the trunk. The trunk is the oldest part of the tree and by exposing it properly, you will show off the age of the bonsai as you are creating it. She’s working on removing some of the bigger roots at the moment. Tapering the root ball so that it has a slope to the centre of the tree. Adriana carefully measures the depth of the pot and the width of the pot to ensure that she has the root ball to the right size. She would mark out the areas that she needs to cut away although keeping in mind that there is one centimetre space between the root ball and the pot surface.

She uses little tags to mark where she’s going to cut to. Because this is a peat based potting mix from the garden centre, it’s actually quite easily done. But with normal bonsai soils, it’s a little bit more tedious but nevertheless, the same instructions have to be followed. What about that Mark? Is that too high? I would go down one centimetre, one and a half centimetre because you’ve got to put soil in it. And then that height is more or less what you want it to be. I’m going to open it a bit more here, as it grows.

That pot is absolutely perfect for it. Adriana adds a thin layer of soil at the base of the pot and then makes a little mound in the centre. She places the root ball in it, jiggles it and fills it up with soil. And then ties the tie wires that we’ve had in the pot. She first hand ties it and cuts away the excess and then ties it with the jin plier to make sure that there is no slack in the tree. However, this is a relatively tall tree in the pot and it will need additional support while the roots extend into the new soil after which it will be fine. Towards the end of the video, you will see how we provide the additional support. Adriana is using the jin pliers now to tighten the wire and remove any slack between the soil and the wire.

Adriana is topping up the surface with some fresh soil. The soil will provide a new area for fresh roots at the top to grow. After a quick dunking, she is adding a thin layer of sphagnum moss onto the soil. The sphagnum moss helps with retaining moisture in the pot and also ensures that the topsoil doesn’t run away when you water it. After the sphagnum moss has been done, she will add green moss onto it at a later stage. She now flattens it down with a spatula to have a nice even gradient from the top of the pot to the top of the nebari, the rim of the pot. And it takes a little bit of doing but the end result is And it takes a little bit of doing but the end result is a very clean, freshly, nicely done pot.

And that’s what we’re looking for. She’s now tying the additional guide wires to ensure that the bonsai is held firmly in the pot so that there is no chance of even the slightest bit of movement once it has settled into it. Adriana is using jute twine to provide the additional support for the tree and this stage is quite essential. Makes the tree much stronger. If you do not add these guide wires on a tall tree like this, the tree tends to move with the breeze and the watering and its recovery can take much longer. But there we are. Here is the end result of the day’s work. It’s a nice-looking tree and it will develop into a weeping style as we go along. The top branches will be curved down and wired down or weighted down depending on which approach Adriana takes. Thank you for watching. We hope you liked the video. If you did, give us a thumbs up, otherwise there’s the other thumbs. But either way, do subscribe and we hope to see you again soon. Thank you for watching.

This is Mark D’Cruz signing out. .

How to make bonsai tree Fuji Cherry or Prunus incisa Kojo-no-mai Bonsai Trees From Nursery Stock

 Hello folks welcome to Ma-Ke Bonsai. This is Mark D’Cruz. Today, I have Adriana with me and we’re going to pot this Fuji Cherry which make beautiful bonsais. This particular picture is of a tree at Kew and you can see it has this beautiful weeping habit which we will try and replicate over the next few years of training. Adriana got this for 8 pounds from the garden centre. She’s going to take it out of the pot and work on the nebari. You start working on the nebari from the top and move down. Move away soil with a chopstick and then gently cut away the roots that have been exposed. Brush the trunk and the nebari to remove any soil and moss that may have collected on the trunk. The trunk is the oldest part of the tree and by exposing it properly, you will show off the age of the bonsai as you are creating it.

She’s working on removing some of the bigger roots at the moment. Tapering the root ball so that it has a slope to the centre of the tree. Adriana carefully measures the depth of the pot and the width of the pot to ensure that she has the root ball to the right size. She would mark out the areas that she needs to cut away although keeping in mind that there is one centimetre space between the root ball and the pot surface. She uses little tags to mark where she’s going to cut to.

Because this is a peat based potting mix from the garden centre, it’s actually quite easily done. But with normal bonsai soils, it’s a little bit more tedious but nevertheless, the same instructions have to be followed. What about that Mark? Is that too high? I would go down one centimetre, one and a half centimetre because you’ve got to put soil in it. And then that height is more or less what you want it to be. I’m going to open it a bit more here, as it grows. That pot is absolutely perfect for it. Adriana adds a thin layer of soil at the base of the pot and then makes a little mound in the centre. She places the root ball in it, jiggles it and fills it up with soil. And then ties the tie wires that we’ve had in the pot. She first hand ties it and cuts away the excess and then ties it with the jin plier to make sure that there is no slack in the tree.

However, this is a relatively tall tree in the pot and it will need additional support while the roots extend into the new soil after which it will be fine. Towards the end of the video, you will see how we provide the additional support. Adriana is using the jin pliers now to tighten the wire and remove any slack between the soil and the wire. Adriana is topping up the surface with some fresh soil. The soil will provide a new area for fresh roots at the top to grow. After a quick dunking, she is adding a thin layer of sphagnum moss onto the soil. The sphagnum moss helps with retaining moisture in the pot and also ensures that the topsoil doesn’t run away when you water it. After the sphagnum moss has been done, she will add green moss onto it at a later stage.

She now flattens it down with a spatula to have a nice even gradient from the top of the pot to the top of the nebari, the rim of the pot. And it takes a little bit of doing but the end result is And it takes a little bit of doing but the end result is a very clean, freshly, nicely done pot.

And that’s what we’re looking for. She’s now tying the additional guide wires to ensure that the bonsai is held firmly in the pot so that there is no chance of even the slightest bit of movement once it has settled into it. Adriana is using jute twine to provide the additional support for the tree and this stage is quite essential. Makes the tree much stronger. If you do not add these guide wires on a tall tree like this, the tree tends to move with the breeze and the watering and its recovery can take much longer. But there we are. Here is the end result of the day’s work. It’s a nice-looking tree and it will develop into a weeping style as we go along.

The top branches will be curved down and wired down or weighted down depending on which approach Adriana takes. Thank you for watching. We hope you liked the video. If you did, give us a thumbs up, otherwise there’s the other thumbs. But either way, do subscribe and we hope to see you again soon. Thank you for watching. This is Mark D’Cruz signing out. .

How to make bonsai Olive or European Olive Bonsai Tree with Ginta bonsai trees #95

Quite good. Yeah, and near the leaves, underneath the branches. Ok. So if there’s a branch, obviously the leaves need to come out. It’s not a stem, it’s a branch. So the stems have leaves and the branches don’t. Branches have other branches on them, no stems. I think they’re too many as well. Shall we take off this one? Actually there are already too many which means something has to go. I think that one has to go, this one. Right, first let’s remove the leaf so we can see the tree, as there’s too many leaves around. So now we can see some branches emerging. I think this one has to go. No, because that is coming out outwards nicely, can you see? So that forms a nice, this guy, first of all is too ugly. Why is too ugly? Because it is straight absolutely, there is no ramification in it.

The little ones are always what we want because bonsai is all about small branches so we try and keep them. There are three coming out of here so… So take the biggest one out and leave the two smaller ones. How is it looking? It’s looking good. Ok, empty out your tray now. .

How to make bonsai tree Fuji Cherry or Prunus incisa Kojo-no-mai Bonsai Trees From Nursery Stock

 Hello folks welcome to Ma-Ke Bonsai. This is Mark D’Cruz. Today, I have Adriana with me and we’re going to pot this Fuji Cherry which make beautiful bonsais. This particular picture is of a tree at Kew and you can see it has this beautiful weeping habit which we will try and replicate over the next few years of training. Adriana got this for 8 pounds from the garden centre. She’s going to take it out of the pot and work on the nebari. You start working on the nebari from the top and move down. Move away soil with a chopstick and then gently cut away the roots that have been exposed. Brush the trunk and the nebari to remove any soil and moss that may have collected on the trunk. The trunk is the oldest part of the tree and by exposing it properly, you will show off the age of the bonsai as you are creating it.

She’s working on removing some of the bigger roots at the moment. Tapering the root ball so that it has a slope to the centre of the tree. Adriana carefully measures the depth of the pot and the width of the pot to ensure that she has the root ball to the right size. She would mark out the areas that she needs to cut away although keeping in mind that there is one centimetre space between the root ball and the pot surface. She uses little tags to mark where she’s going to cut to. Because this is a peat based potting mix from the garden centre, it’s actually quite easily done. But with normal bonsai soils, it’s a little bit more tedious but nevertheless, the same instructions have to be followed.

What about that Mark? Is that too high? I would go down one centimetre, one and a half centimetre because you’ve got to put soil in it. And then that height is more or less what you want it to be. I’m going to open it a bit more here, as it grows. That pot is absolutely perfect for it. Adriana adds a thin layer of soil at the base of the pot and then makes a little mound in the centre. She places the root ball in it, jiggles it and fills it up with soil. And then ties the tie wires that we’ve had in the pot. She first hand ties it and cuts away the excess and then ties it with the jin plier to make sure that there is no slack in the tree.

However, this is a relatively tall tree in the pot and it will need additional support while the roots extend into the new soil after which it will be fine. Towards the end of the video, you will see how we provide the additional support. Adriana is using the jin pliers now to tighten the wire and remove any slack between the soil and the wire. Adriana is topping up the surface with some fresh soil.

The soil will provide a new area for fresh roots at the top to grow. After a quick dunking, she is adding a thin layer of sphagnum moss onto the soil. The sphagnum moss helps with retaining moisture in the pot and also ensures that the topsoil doesn’t run away when you water it. After the sphagnum moss has been done, she will add green moss onto it at a later stage.

She now flattens it down with a spatula to have a nice even gradient from the top of the pot to the top of the nebari, the rim of the pot. And it takes a little bit of doing but the end result is And it takes a little bit of doing but the end result is a very clean, freshly, nicely done pot. And that’s what we’re looking for. She’s now tying the additional guide wires to ensure that the bonsai is held firmly in the pot so that there is no chance of even the slightest bit of movement once it has settled into it. Adriana is using jute twine to provide the additional support for the tree and this stage is quite essential. Makes the tree much stronger. If you do not add these guide wires on a tall tree like this, the tree tends to move with the breeze and the watering and its recovery can take much longer. But there we are. Here is the end result of the day’s work. It’s a nice-looking tree and it will develop into a weeping style as we go along.

The top branches will be curved down and wired down or weighted down depending on which approach Adriana takes. Thank you for watching. We hope you liked the video. If you did, give us a thumbs up, otherwise there’s the other thumbs. But either way, do subscribe and we hope to see you again soon. Thank you for watching. This is Mark D’Cruz signing out. .

How to make bonsai tree Fuji Cherry or Prunus incisa Kojo-no-mai Bonsai Trees From Nursery Stock

 Hello folks welcome to Ma-Ke Bonsai. This is Mark D’Cruz. Today, I have Adriana with me and we’re going to pot this Fuji Cherry which make beautiful bonsais. This particular picture is of a tree at Kew and you can see it has this beautiful weeping habit which we will try and replicate over the next few years of training. Adriana got this for 8 pounds from the garden centre. She’s going to take it out of the pot and work on the nebari. You start working on the nebari from the top and move down. Move away soil with a chopstick and then gently cut away the roots that have been exposed.

Brush the trunk and the nebari to remove any soil and moss that may have collected on the trunk. The trunk is the oldest part of the tree and by exposing it properly, you will show off the age of the bonsai as you are creating it. She’s working on removing some of the bigger roots at the moment. Tapering the root ball so that it has a slope to the centre of the tree. Adriana carefully measures the depth of the pot and the width of the pot to ensure that she has the root ball to the right size. She would mark out the areas that she needs to cut away although keeping in mind that there is one centimetre space between the root ball and the pot surface. She uses little tags to mark where she’s going to cut to. Because this is a peat based potting mix from the garden centre, it’s actually quite easily done. But with normal bonsai soils, it’s a little bit more tedious but nevertheless, the same instructions have to be followed. What about that Mark? Is that too high? I would go down one centimetre, one and a half centimetre because you’ve got to put soil in it.

And then that height is more or less what you want it to be. I’m going to open it a bit more here, as it grows. That pot is absolutely perfect for it. Adriana adds a thin layer of soil at the base of the pot and then makes a little mound in the centre. She places the root ball in it, jiggles it and fills it up with soil. And then ties the tie wires that we’ve had in the pot. She first hand ties it and cuts away the excess and then ties it with the jin plier to make sure that there is no slack in the tree.

However, this is a relatively tall tree in the pot and it will need additional support while the roots extend into the new soil after which it will be fine. Towards the end of the video, you will see how we provide the additional support. Adriana is using the jin pliers now to tighten the wire and remove any slack between the soil and the wire. Adriana is topping up the surface with some fresh soil. The soil will provide a new area for fresh roots at the top to grow. After a quick dunking, she is adding a thin layer of sphagnum moss onto the soil.

The sphagnum moss helps with retaining moisture in the pot and also ensures that the topsoil doesn’t run away when you water it. After the sphagnum moss has been done, she will add green moss onto it at a later stage. She now flattens it down with a spatula to have a nice even gradient from the top of the pot to the top of the nebari, the rim of the pot. And it takes a little bit of doing but the end result is And it takes a little bit of doing but the end result is a very clean, freshly, nicely done pot. And that’s what we’re looking for. She’s now tying the additional guide wires to ensure that the bonsai is held firmly in the pot so that there is no chance of even the slightest bit of movement once it has settled into it.

Adriana is using jute twine to provide the additional support for the tree and this stage is quite essential. Makes the tree much stronger. If you do not add these guide wires on a tall tree like this, the tree tends to move with the breeze and the watering and its recovery can take much longer. But there we are. Here is the end result of the day’s work.

It’s a nice-looking tree and it will develop into a weeping style as we go along. The top branches will be curved down and wired down or weighted down depending on which approach Adriana takes. Thank you for watching. We hope you liked the video. If you did, give us a thumbs up, otherwise there’s the other thumbs. But either way, do subscribe and we hope to see you again soon. Thank you for watching. This is Mark D’Cruz signing out. .

106) Why are Bonsai Trees Expensive

Here we shall explore a commonly asked question: why are bonsai trees expensive? Well, if you consider naturally collected trees, they are one in a million, so trying to find them is quite a challenge for one. Or even if you did manage to find them, trying to collect them is another challenge. More often than not, they are hanging off cliff faces or in place that are difficult to get to which is why they’re small in the first place.

So even after you have managed to collect them, you’ve got to be able to make them survive. If you have a one-in-a-million tree, it’s already, the chances of it surviving are reduced even further. So, yes they are expensive. Naturally collected trees can be really, really expensive. If you have field grown trees or even grown nursery trees, well it takes time to get them, at the least six years. So imagine watering them, feeding them fertilising them, giving them the right amount of light and sun and of course, the cost of the land.

Oh don’t forget the cost of labour. So yes, all of that adds up to a significant amount of cost. And if that’s not all, when you start making them into proper bonsais, you’re going to need a decent ceramic pot to dress up your bonsai tree, which as you know, costs a significant amount of money. And then there is the cost of tools and equipment and well, I just mentioned land. Having, if that’s not enough, you’ll eventually or mostly get these trees from the orient so they have to be shipped all the way. So there’s the cost of shipping and the cost of importing them into Europe or the U.K, or even the States or wherever else. But if you intend to do that, then there is the cost of duty or a duty or taxes or whatever else it is that you have to pay.

By the time you’ve got the tree from wherever, it usually ends up costing four times or five times as much as where it was originally imported from. So well, they do cost a lot of money even here in the U.K or especially here in Europe and in the U.K. But remember, people have spent time and energy, love and effort in growing these tress, 6 to 30 years or even more. So I hope you enjoy your bonsai and if you did enjoy this video, don’t forget to share and subscribe, and don’t forget to ask me any questions and I’ll try to answer them in the comments below. Thank you. .

How to make bonsai Juniper Bonsai from Nursery Stock – Bonsai Trees for Beginners Series #161

 Welcome to Ma-ke Bonsai. This is Mark D’ Cruz. Today, we’re going to plant juniper that Bogdan has got from a garden centre. He paid 22 pounds for this and he’s planted it in this large garden pot for a couple of years and it’s gained a nice set of roots at the bottom. It’s now ready to be bonsaied, I guess. That’s the phase that we’re looking for. We start by working on the top to find where the nebari is. We turn the tree around to find the right angle. And the nebari will help us determine the right size. On turning the tree around, it was found that these two branches were a little bit on the low side and were not required. We decided to cut them off. And it seems that they got a nice set of roots so we will save them. We wrapped them in some sphagnum moss, tied them into a little bundle ready for repotting at a later stage. Back to pruning the roots away from the top of the sawing. We expose the nebari and work away all the fine roots that are there.

The nebari is the broadest part of the trunk and that’s what we’re looking for. We have a nice big branch that flows to one side so this is going to be a semi cascade kind of tree. We have a couple of low branches which we will remove and make into jins at a later stage. We trim away some of the branches so that we can actually see all the major branches that we will need.

We wire the bigger branches so that we can move them into position at this stage. So, now we’re ready to do some of the finer branches. And we just carry on with this till we got everything. After the wiring, we set the tree in the pot giving it the right angle that we require. We cover it with the bonsai mix which is Akadama and pumice that we use for most of our trees.

This particular size is 3 mm to 6 mm. It helps hold a lot of water so the Juniper likes a lot of water. We use it for the Juniper. Adriana ties the tree inside and then we tighten it with a jin plier. We pull and remove any gaps that that appear. There are a lot of videos that will show you the details on how to repot a bonsai. As with applying moss or with how to wire the bonsai into the pot as well. Adriana’s giving it a quick clean now. That’s always part of the process that we go through. And then we apply green moss on to the tree. I’m now going to be jining the branches that are cut away. I remove all the cambium from the bark from the branch. I split the branch into four and then use the jin plier to strip away bits of it so that it appears that we have a natural break in the trunk.

No cut branches should appear. And there we are. This is the Juniper, nicely potted up. It’s been shaped into a semi cascade style. In a couple of years, we will give it another bit of styling and make it a little bit more in keeping with what we want. Thank you for watching. If you enjoyed the video, please give us a thumbs up. And if not, well there’s the other icon. And do subscribe. We add videos regularly. Thank you. .

08) Bonsai Trees for beginners Series: Watering Bonsai Trees

My name is Mark D’Cruz of Ma-Ke Bonsai and I’m going to talk to you about watering bonsais. Why is water important to bonsai? Bonsai, like other plants and animals, are made up of the majority of water. Plants -between 70 to 95 % of water. Plants need water to distribute food within the tree. Plants need water to take the raw materials up from the roots to the leaves. Plants need water to make the food. Plants need water to distribute the toxins that it makes to fight off other diseases and pests.

We have watering cans and the different kinds, large and small but the most important thing about a watering can is that it should have a large spout or a long spout and the rose should be fine. Now the watering hose and lance both need fine roses. The roses have a number of holes in them that is quite substantial and the watering lance can distribute about 40 litres per minute. So watering with the watering lance is quite fast but also needs to be very carefully managed. When we are watering with the watering can, we need to make sure that the rose is pointing upwards and the water lies gently onto the pot surface. You only need to water a pot if it feels dry to the touch. If it feels damp, if it feels like a wet rag, it doesn’t need to be watered. Once you watered the pot, just make sure that you go up and down the pot three times. The first time helps the top surface absorb some water.

The second time, some of the water goes down to the bottom of the pot. The final watering ensures that watering goes all the way down and fills up the pot. When you’re watering with the lance, make sure that the lance is pointing upwards again and that the water falls gently onto the bonsai pot. Again, ensure that you do not water a pot if it is wet to the touch. You only water it when it is dry to the touch. You only water a bonsai in the morning. In the afternoon, sometimes in the middle of summer, perhaps you could water it just lightly, but more often than not you’ll just wet the leaves. Once again, when you’re watering with the lance, do a three pass system. One. To water the surface so that the water penetrates into the surface. Two, so that some of the water penetrates into the pot and the third pass is so that water finally passes right into it. And that’s how we water a bonsai.

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Dwarf Murraya Paniculata, NATURAL BONSAI TREE Step 2, Be the Creator, Sept. 2018,

Hello! This is Samar … welcomes you to Be The Creator Bonsai Gardening You will remember last November… … my two natural bonsai Ive transplanted from nursery pot Then I had some confusion … regarding the name of these trees Most of the friends assume it as Boxus Then one of the friends, named Amit Kumar … Removed my confusion That is Dwarf Murraya Paniculata … That means, its a dwarf variety of Kamini Thank you once again Amit. Now it has nicely settled in the pot and …. according to my plan … I’ve to prune them now Due to its dense foliage, … no sunlight can reach inside So … In the interior … … no shoots can develop.. getting die back automaticaly And it’s trunk and branches ….

Can’t get strong and healthy If I’ll prune it … then every part of the tree will get sunlight and … will grow more strong and … healthy The work I’ll do in this episode … you will understand every thing while watching On last episode …. the 12 … rules to select bonsai branches That I’ve shared …. I’m applying those rules here Please watch it carefully Occasionally, unwanted branches … are also grown To balance the tree growth … and in future we have to prune it These type of branch is … called Sacrifice branch Observation … is a vital job … to make bonsai You have to observe your trees regularly As much as you observe your trees … that much the relationship with your trees … will become stronger Such time will come, when .. Language of the trees … you will begin to understand The trees also say something Along with the weather … they change themselves Some time full of new foliage and shoots … Or sometimes it becomes like that gets tired You can only observe the upper potion of a tree Seeing which you have to understand … what is going on, under the soil When you see a green blossoming tree …

Then understand- their rootball too … is in the same condition New shoots means new roots Seasonal plants … which you grow for blooms and fruits etc. … I’m not talking about that I’m talking about the long living plants Not any long living trees … grow continuously They grow on a particular season … and on another season … take rest also which is … called dormancy period Wht is the perfect time to work on bonsai ? Not in the dormancy period .. and not in growing season After dormancy .. when the tree is preparing for growth …

That is the best time Then you do root correction, …. transplantation ….. and pruning work. To make proper bonsai you need sense of art along with .. a good soul too. Observing the trees, … caring them is a continuous process After an uninterrupted 5, 10, 20 or 25 years of … working on a tree… you can make a proper bonsai After such a long time of togetherness … your relation that buildup withe the tree is so deep, you can imagine it The bonsai coming from generations are so different Friends Bonsai is waste of time according to some body Don’t want to offend anyone…. But i would say so …. The ones who spend time with Bonsai … they are not valuing there time commercially …. while doing these works And vale is not the price only … something more than that which can’t be purchased Like that ….

Bonsai is an art And Only … this is the art which is called … Living Art Bonsai and the artist has living relation Thats all for now friends See you on next video Till then Goodbye .